Join Aimoo Group buy, get more 5% discount. Please click here for details.
Close it  
Remove ads
dogs of war
Today | Join | Member | Search | Who's On | Chat Room | Photos | Help | Shop | Sign In | | | | | Follow Aimoo_Com on Twitter
Make a donation click here. Your support will help us remove ads and upload local images, etc.
Title: 50 BEST COMEDY SKITS OF ALL TIME
Hop to: 
Views:576     
New Topic New Poll
<<Previous ThreadNext Thread>>
Page 1 / 1    
AuthorComment
magna
 Author    



Rank:Diamond Member

Status: RULER OF FIVE GALAXIES AND BOSS OF TV REMOTE
Score: 7416
Posts: 7416
From: Canada
Registered: 12/06/2008

(Date Posted:06/19/2009 1:08 AM)
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo

50 Greatest Comedy Sketches  

There's no more sure-fire way to kill something's intrinsic comedic value than to try to examine what makes it funny. The minute you start thinking, you stop laughing. So why, then, have Nerve and IFC.com devoted an enormous amount of time, manpower, monetary resources, server space and posh catered lunches to the pursuit of ranking the boob tube's finest sketch comedy offerings?

In part, we're here because magical new technology (*coughYouTubecough*) allows us to do more than just pontificate for paragraphs on end — now we can pontificate for paragraphs on end and provide audio-visual evidence to back up those pontifications. We provide the context, share our thoughts and feelings and let you commence with the guffawing and, naturally, the disagreeing. After all, the comedy sketch — short, sweet, completely silly or shot through with social commentary — worms its way into the public mind like nothing else, and has easily made the leap to the web when other forms have faltered. ...read more



50. "More Cowbell," Saturday Night Live, 2000


More Cowbell - More amazing videos are a click away

This sketch provided a showcase for Will Ferrell's mugging and Jimmy Fallon's snickering, while simultaneously reducing one of the greatest rock songs ever to an annoying catchphrase. It's also hilarious, with a sterling performance by Christopher Walken as legendary producer Bruce Dickinson. (No relation to the Iron Maiden vocalist.) Still, we resent that we can't hear "Don't Fear the Reaper" anymore without some ninny shouting those two fateful words. — Peter Smith


promotion

49. "Ass Pennies," Upright Citizens Brigade, 1998


How do you harness unwavering confidence in any social situation? By knowing that whomever you're talking with has a wallet full of pennies that have been up your ass. Hearing a businessman scream on a golf course about shoving 3,000 pennies into his anus daily is notable on its own, but in 1998, when televised comedy was restricted to premium channels, low-ebb SNL and MadTV, it was a breath of fresh air. — John Constantine



48. "Gerald Ford Dead at 83," Saturday Night Live, 1996


Yes, he's actually dead now, but that doesn't mean this can't still be funny. Dana Carvey impersonates Tom Brokaw pre-taping the announcement of former president Gerald Ford's death so he can go to Barbados for the winter. You know, just in case. Gerald Ford overdoses on crack cocaine, Gerald Ford eaten by a circus lion, Gerald Ford strangled by Richard Nixon — in classic SNL formula, the scene unhurriedly escalates until Carvey is forced to insist, in Brokaw's pitch-perfect arid tone, "Well, that's just superfluous." — Will Doig

47. "$240 Worth of Pudding," The State, 1993


In the mid-'90s, nothing was funnier than a cocky male swinger (see also: SNL's Roxbury Guys and The Onion's Smoove B). And none of them got a better catchphrase than The State's Barry and Levon. Played by Thomas Lennon and Michael Ian Black, Barry and Levon would sweet-talk the viewer, wearing crushed velvet jackets and Jheri curls, grooving to an R&B beat in the background. The twist was that their ardor was reserved mainly for inanimate objects. In their most memorable sketch, Barry and Levon purr seductively about their latest purchase: $240 worth of pudding. ("We had the $240 — we had to have the pudding.") While the two-minute sketch ends with the swingers grinding against a gigantic vanilla mound, the real payoff is the phrase "$240 worth of pudding" — an expression that didn't exist before The State, and now brings up 12,000 hits in Google. — Gwynne Watkins


46. "Celebrity Jeopardy!," Saturday Night Live, 1996

SNL first parodied Jeopardy!'s dumbed-down, for-charity "celebrity" episodes in 1996, casting Norm MacDonald as Burt Reynolds, Darrell Hammond as Sean Connery, guest Martin Short as Jerry Lewis and Will Ferrell as a long-suffering Alex Trebek. Throughout nine years of the sketch, the gag remained the same: the IQ-challenged celebrities never got a correct answer, even with categories like "Foods That End in -Amburger" and clues like "This is the sound a dog makes." Although "Celebrity Jeopardy" was first intended to showcase MacDonald's uncanny Burt Reynolds impression, Hammond's belligerent Sean Connery soon stole the spotlight. Connery seemed to be on the show only to torment Alex Trebek, whether deliberately mispronouncing category titles ("I'll take The Rapists for $200." "That's Therapists.") or telling inappropriate jokes ("What's the difference between you and a mallard with a cold? One's a sick duck and I can't remember how it ends, but your mother's a whore.") For years, it was impossible to flip past Jeopardy! on TV without someone in the room growling "Trebek!" in a Scottish accent. — GW


45. "The Ginger Refuge," The Catherine Tate Show, 2006


Catherine Tate is Britain's current one-woman answer to Saturday Night Live, and in three seasons of her sketch show, she's created enough recurring characters to rival that institution's (including Nan, the ultimate passive-aggressive grandmother, and the teenager Lauren Cooper, whose catchphrase "Am I bovvered?" has been uttered and reviled as much as anything SNL ever produced). But Tate is also capable of the one-off spectacular. In "The Ginger Refuge," she addresses Britain's time-honored abuse of a certain oppressed class, extending it to its logical conclusion. — Michael Martin
usertype:1

--------------------------------------------------------------
ARE WE THERE YET ?????

magna
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 1# 



Rank:Diamond Member

Status: RULER OF FIVE GALAXIES AND BOSS OF TV REMOTE
Score:7416
Posts:7416
From: Canada
Registered:12/06/2008

RE:50 BEST COMEDY SKITS OF ALL TIME
(Date Posted:06/19/2009 1:13 AM)

44. "Monkey Torture," The State, 1995


At the beginning of this sketch by The State, set on the fictional Barry Lutz Show, host Michael Ian Black (as Barry Lutz) introduces "Dr. Martin Crank, America's foremost primate zoologist." Dr. Crank (Thomas Lennon) quickly corrects him, saying the conventional terms of science are too limited to describe his work: "I feel I've opened up a whole new arena of experimentation, which I call 'monkey torture.'" He goes on to describe his research, which consists of playing cruel psychological tricks on his subjects like driving them to the edge of the jungle, pretending he's about to set them free and then driving back home. He then demonstrates his technique with an actual monkey. The sketch is a pitch-perfect parody of vapid talk shows, where the hosts maintain feigned enthusiasm about their "experts" no matter how ludicrous they actually sound. And it contains Dr. Crank's invaluable advice for children who are interested in his field: "I'd say get a monkey, and just torture the hell out of it." — GW



43. "The Pre-Taped Call-in Show," Mr. Show, 1997


In a hysterically unsettling portrayal of barely controlled frustration, David Cross hosts an absurd pre-taped call-in show (on his own show, Mr. Show), and can't understand why his listeners can't grasp the concept. I spent the first two minutes of this sketch trying to figure out how a pre-taped call-in show could actually work, before realizing that it can't, which is the source of Cross's irritation. Framing the scene is an elderly man who sits next to him, silent and serene throughout the skit. The ending is what takes it from intelligent to genius, a perfect portrait of the exasperation of live-broadcast entertainment. — WD


42. "Modern Mother & Daughter," French & Saunders, 1992


In terms of impact, "Modern Mother & Daughter"
is one of the most productive comedy sketches of all time, spawning six seasons of the classic sitcom Absolutely Fabulous. Here's where it all started, with Jennifer Saunders as a flighty, fashion-obsessed mum, and Dawn French as her sensible offspring. (Consider that the premise of familial role reversal has given us Freaky Friday, Family Ties, and at least one Judge Reinhold movie, and F&S's genius is even more apparent.) — MM


41. "Chicken Lady at the Strip Show," Kids in the Hall, 1991



Of all the piles of strange this Canadian troupe left at our mental doorstep, this one could not be easily brushed aside. Mark McKinney's sexually compulsive Chicken Lady laid eggs during blind dates and clucked her way through phone sex. She was a literal freak coping with an increasingly freakish world — which was the point, we think, or maybe not. Maybe the Chicken Lady sketches were simply drug-inspired theater of the absurd, which make them no less enjoyable. Here, she has a girls' night out with fellow freak-show escapee the Bearded Lady, and she meets the love of her life. — MM


usertype:1 tt= 0

--------------------------------------------------------------
ARE WE THERE YET ?????

Support us

Create free forum and click the links below and your donations will make a difference here.

www.dinodirect.com

A Huge Online Store for Various Cool Gadgets, Accessories: Laser Pointer, Bluetooth Headset, Cell Phone Jammer, MP3 Players, Spy Cameras, Soccer Jersey, Window Curtains, MP4 Player, E Cigarette, Wedding Dresses, Hearing Aids, eBook Reader, Tattoo Machines, LED Light Bulbs, Bluetooth Stereo Headset, Holiday Gifts, Security Camera and Games Accessories and Hobby Gadgets.  
magna
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 2# 



Rank:Diamond Member

Status: RULER OF FIVE GALAXIES AND BOSS OF TV REMOTE
Score:7416
Posts:7416
From: Canada
Registered:12/06/2008

RE:50 BEST COMEDY SKITS OF ALL TIME
(Date Posted:06/19/2009 1:18 AM)


40. Citizen Kane - The Kids in the Hall

The Kids in the Hall were absurdists of the finest order, and this memorable sketch from their inaugural season begins like a segment from an early "Seinfeld" episode before gleefully launching into loonier territory. The premise is simple: While eating at a diner, Dave Foley attempts to tell Kevin McDonald about the great movie he saw on TV the previous night. From his initial description, it's clear the film in question is "Citizen Kane," but Foley refuses to agree, going so far as to suggest that the movie, "about this newspaper tycoon and he's dead, and everybody is telling stories about him," was actually called "Psycho." It's a joke rooted in a universal feeling of frustration with obstinacy, and, concluding with ridiculous violence made hilarious by Foley's nonchalant reaction to being attacked, it's sure to satisfy the bloodlust of anyone who's ever had to put up with a memory-challenged boob. —Nick Schager

39. Porcupine Racetrack - The State

Is "Porcupine Racetrack" the best musical of the '90s? I wouldn't argue against it. A parody of Broadway musicals played so straight it's almost an homage, it packs in class consciousness, an aborted tap breakdown, syrupy melodrama ("So God if you're above / And it's orphans / That you love / Then help the porcupine I chose") and the triumph of the human spirit (in the form of Thomas Lennon wearing a giant porcupine outfit) into less than three minutes. It's a marvel of performance and production design on a budget — the manic energy of the cast selling every last ounce of the willfully bizarre premise. Conceived by Mr. Lennon and set to music and performed by Teddy Shapiro, who wrote most of the incidental music on the show, it's a tour de force of brightly colored absurdity — performed with loving care, all the way down to the checked suits and newsboy caps. —R. Emmet Sweeney

38. White, White Baby - In Living Color

Before his seduction by the siren song of acting respectability, Jim Carrey was one of the best sketch comedy performers this country ever saw. Carrey had his share of recurring characters during his five years on "In Living Color," but his unforgettable one-off performance as Vanilla Ice on the show's brutal "Ice, Ice Baby" parody showcases all of his talents: remarkable vocal and facial contortions coupled with incredible body control (his silly dance moves are arguably better than the real Ice's) an uncontrollable streak of infectious energy, and a total lack of self-consciousness (sell that butt-wiping joke, Jim, sell it!). Carrey's "White, White Baby" is two and a half minutes of pure killer, no filler, with clever lyrics ("I'm white and I'm capitalizing / On a trend that's currently rising / I'm livin' large and my bank is stupid / Cause I just listen to real rap and dupe it") and great bits of Carrey business, including references to the Three Stooges and "I'm a Little Teapot." Jim, I know it's hard saying no to directorial greats like Ron Howard and Joel Schumacher, but I'm begging you: come back to us! —Matt Singer

37. Saying Goodbye - Smack the Pony

As two friends say farewell after a dinner party, a man displays his affection for the host, roaming his arms over her body and planting proprietary kisses all over her. The departing guest shifts to maintain a comfortable distance between herself and the couple, which only encourages the man to grow bolder, to the point that's he's nuzzling her friend's stomach. We sympathize with the guest — her discomfort is obvious — until she indicates to the man — her man — that it's time to go. These universally awkward moments: bearing witness to increasingly frisky PDA, the prolonged goodbye on the threshold after a party, are made all the worse because they're experienced in tandem, and the bar is further raised when we realize we've jumped to the wrong conclusions. But the skit's perfection is sealed by its length — the whole thing takes place in less than a minute. So even though we're still digesting... it's time to go. —Lily Oei

36. Mind Match - The State

There's so much material to mock on your average game show — the slimy host, the lame prizes, the idiotic questions — that it's hard to nail all the potential targets in a single sketch, but "The State"'s "Mind Match" pulls it off. Kevin Allison is the nauseatingly peppy host, and Thomas Lennon and Kerri Kenney the unhappy contestants who suddenly discover that instead of cash, their right answers are netting them real live orphans (dressed like 19th century orphans for the sake of comedy and clarity). And you thought turtle wax was a crummy prize. Since Lennon and Kenney obviously don't want orphans and there's seemingly no way of ditching them, they start answering incorrectly on purpose ("Name a form of transportation!" "Um...blue?"). Though the entirety of this three-and-a-half minute sketch is perfectly funny, the most subversive touch comes after a few viewings, when you realize the show has put you in a position to actively root against the well-being of orphaned children. —M.S.

35. I Know Black People - Chappelle's Show

Dave Chappelle's faux game show, "I Know Black People," is based around a simple concept — that black culture is both alien and alluring to most whites — and elaborates ten mostly improvised minutes of uproarious comedy out of it. What makes it work is its lack of condescension — the contestants (who range from an African Studies professor to a writer on the show) aren't the joke, but their answers often are. Chappelle's questions range from straight definitions (The writer thinks a "loosey" is a term for oral sex (really a loose cigarette)), to statements on the future of the black race ("How can black people rise up and overcome?"). It's comedy of mutual misunderstanding (or in one contestant's case, the barber, of the poetic vulgarity of understanding), all MC'd by Chappelle's ingratiatingly sarcastic presence. Utopia is not far off, however, as all racial boundaries are transcended during a sing-along to the theme from "Good Times." —R.E.S.

34. Wycked Sceptre Party Tape - Mr. Show

Heavy metal band Wycked Sceptre has a problem. A homemade videotape of one of their parties is about to leak to the public and on it, the guys are having sex... with each other. But when their record label reps, played by Jay Johnston and Tom Kenny, call them in to talk about it, they're shocked to find that despite their personal taste, the Sceptres hate gay people. These musicians, you see, they are intensely stupid. Johnston, whose character is gay, walks the band (played by David Cross, Bob Odenkirk and John Ennis) through the footage (Cross to Odenkirk as he's doing him: "You are SO naked!!") and then gently tries to drop the sexual bombshell by explaining, step by step, the connection between his sexual preference and the band's. "Because I'm gay," he explains, "I use this tape to stimulate into having an erection. Then I use that erection to masturbate with." Their less-than-respectful response: the homophobic f-word. The result is nothing less than the best dumb rock star parody in any medium since "This is Spinal Tap." —M.S.

33. The Spanish Inquisition - Monty Python

In England, this classic Monty Python sketch assures us, simply uttering the phrase, "I didn't expect the Spanish Inquisition!" triggers the sudden arrival of a trio of red-robed cardinals. Priding themselves on their capacity to surprise and instill fear, the hapless crew is too bogged down by repeated recitations of their mission, and in one instance, cross-town traffic, to prove at all menacing. (Like bad comics, the cardinals have not quite mastered timing and delivery.) Leave it to the Pythons to take religious persecution and burnish it into comedy. Instead of administering ruthless auto de fe on their startled victims, the cardinals rely on household sundries as tools of torture — a dish-drying rack, some plump cushions, a comfy chair. As Cardinal Ximenez, Michael Palin is mortified by the limitations of his bumbling team and tries to step up his game... by raising his voice: "I suppose we make it worse by shouting a lot." An iconic skit, it seems fitting that the phrase "the Spanish Inquisition" has become synonymous in pop culture with the unexpected. Any lesser tribute would be heresy. —L.O.

32. Four Yorkshiremen - At Last the 1948 Show

It's an obnoxious truth of existence that rich people always claim that life was easier and happier when they were poor. Never was this idiocy more satisfyingly lampooned as by the cast of "At Last the 1948 Show," Marty Feldman, Tim Brooke-Taylor, and a pre-Monty Python John Cleese and Graham Chapman, in their "Four Yorkshiremen" sketch. Lounging in tuxedos with cigars and fine champagne, they reminisce about the "good old days" when they were penniless and happy, back when they grateful even for a simple cup of tea. "Cup of cold tea," Graham interjects. "Without milk or sugar!" adds John. "Or tea!" replies Tim. Thus begins a hysterical bout of one-upsmanship, filled to the brim with classic British absurdism. "House? You were lucky to have a house! We used to live in one room, 26 of us!" says Graham, to which Tim replies, "Room? You were lucky to have a room! We used to have to live in a corridor!", to which Marty responds "Corridor? I used to dream of living in a corridor!" And so on until the very rules of time and space have been shattered in the interest of poverty pride. The sketch is so perfect that Python covered it in their live shows. —M.S.

31. Four Candles - The Two Ronnies

Armed with a lengthy shopping list, one man (Ronnie Barker) tries to work through it with the help of the general store shopkeeper (Ronnie Corbett). Dropping his aitches liberally, Barker pleasantly makes his requests — four candles, hose, pumps — to the increasing consternation of Corbett, who reflexively fetches all the wrong items. The "four candles" Barker wants are fork handles; "the hose" are letter O's; the pumps are ladies' shoes. We giggle with Barker, we commiserate with Corbett, but the real stars of the show are the elisions and homophones. At the end of his tether, Corbett finally stomps off when he spots "bill hooks" on the list — a way of slipping "bollocks" into the skit without actually saying it. Slapstick and pratfalls have their place in comedy, but it's refreshing to remember that wordplay can be all that's required to elicit a smile. —L.O.
usertype:1 tt= 0

--------------------------------------------------------------
ARE WE THERE YET ?????

magna
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 3# 



Rank:Diamond Member

Status: RULER OF FIVE GALAXIES AND BOSS OF TV REMOTE
Score:7416
Posts:7416
From: Canada
Registered:12/06/2008

RE:50 BEST COMEDY SKITS OF ALL TIME
(Date Posted:06/19/2009 1:22 AM)

30. "Whatever Happened to Baby Dawn?" French & Saunders


The cult classic Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? is so campy and over-the-top that it would seem to defy parody. Yet master satirists Dawn French and Jennifer Saunders manage to one-up the film with this ten-minute homage. Every detail from the original film is dead-on, from the comediennes' uncanny impersonations of Bette Davis and Joan Crawford to the grotesque hair and makeup. But French and Saunders ratchet up the absurdity, turning the story of two faded movie-star sisters (one completely mad, the other crippled and living at her mercy) into one about their own comedic partnership. Instead of Joan Crawford watching her old Hollywood films, we see Jennifer Saunders watching two-year-old comedy sketches, sighing "Gosh, I was funny!" with wistful sincerity. But Dawn French gets all the good gags, showing off her functional legs to her crippled sister by doing a can-can. (The funny part is, you can imagine Bette Davis doing the same thing as soon as the cameras stopped rolling.) Since this sketch aired, French and Saunders have taken separate turns in the spotlight — Saunders in Absolutely Fabulous, French in The Vicar of Dibley — but they continue to reunite for new, parody-rife BBC specials. Like the two crazed sisters in this sketch, they'll never entirely be apart. — GW

29. "Argument to Beethoven's Fifth," Caesar's Hour, 1954


Here, on live TV, without benefit of editing or retakes, Sid Caesar and Nanette Fabray silently mime a domestic dispute whose crescendos and valleys perfectly correspond to classical music. It's brilliant, and there's not much more to say. — MM


promotion
28. "Wayne's World Crime Re-Enactment," Saturday Night Live

For whatever asinine reason, NBC has yet to issue the collected Wayne's World sketches. Maybe they're sparing their energies for The Best of Chris Kattan, Volume 3. A couple are available on The Best of Mike Myers, but sadly not this one, which showcases Myers's gift for physical comedy. Dana Carvey thought they were just aping the dim-bulbed Bill and Ted, but I always felt like Wayne was in on the joke. — PS

27. "Head Crusher vs. Face Pincher," Kids in the Hall, 1989



"I am crushing your head," is a phrase synonymous with Kids in the Hall, not just because of the regularity of the bit but because it's two seconds of pure idiocy that personifies the show. It shouldn't be funny. Mark McKinney sitting in a park pressing his thumb and forefinger together while making a funny voice shouldn't make you laugh out loud. But it does. — JC


26. "Great White North," SCTV, 1981


Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas play two ignorant hick Canadians (if this were airing today, they'd probably be playing the same characters as Americans) who discuss things on their homemade talk show such as how to get a mouse into a Molson bottle so the company will give you a free case of beer as an apology. The trick? Get it in there when it's still a baby, then feed it for a month. Aye? — WD

25. "The Clock," Your Show of Shows, 1953


With ninety minutes of live comedy every Saturday night in the mid-'50s, Your Show of Shows set the mold for SNL and all sketch shows thereafter. Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca played an wide array of characters — frustrated spouses, showbiz types, inanimate objects — supported by a writing team that included Mel Brooks, Woody Allen and Neil Simon. In this classic bit of physical comedy, Caesar, Coca, Carl Reiner and Howard Morris are characters on a German cuckoo clock who go haywire and proceed to beat the crap out of each other. — MM

24. "Sweeps Week/The Days of the Week," SCTV, 1983


Rendering future soap-opera parodies unnecessary, SCTV's "Days of the Week" stretched through two seasons in the early '80s, incorporating the entire cast of comic geniuses, often in dual roles: Catherine O'Hara as prim matriarch Violet McKay, Rick Moranis as terminally ill playboy Clay Collins, Andrea Martin as semi-autistic maid/punching bag Mojo. This clip is from the climactic wedding episode, and it includes a promo for SCTV's Sweeps Week, which touts programs like "Jumping for Dollars." — MM


23. "Lord and Lady Douchebag", Saturday Night Live, 1980

The last sketch featuring SNL's original cast, it's one of the era's LOLest. The setting is an eighteenth-century society party attended exclusively by inventors: the Earl of Sandwich, Lord Salisbury, the Duke of Worcestershire and . . . you've probably guessed it by now. Party conversation is a double-entendrefest involving Lord Douchebag's plans for political office and Lady Douchebag's choice of salad dressing. Sadly, NBC has yet to upload the video to Hulu, but the transcript (linked above) is nearly as entertaining. — MM

22. "Went With the Wind," The Carol Burnett Show, 1976



Carol Burnett and her cast (including Tim Conway, Harvey Korman and Vicki Lawrence) had comic genius to spare, but many of the variety show's laughs were generated solely by Bob Mackie's over-the-top costumes. The team's best visual gag came during this Gone With the Wind parody: a broke Scarlett O'Hara (Burnett) tears the curtains off Tara's windows to create a dress, but instead of emerging in the film's iconic green velvet grown, she descends the stairs wearing the curtains intact — complete with a curtain rod thrown over her shoulders. When Rhett (Korman) compliments her attire, Burnett deadpans a classic kicker: "Thank you. I saw it in a window and I just couldn't resist it." The sketch is said to have generated the longest continuous studio audience laugh in the show's eleven-year history. — GW

21. "The French Chef," Saturday Night Live, 1979

A classic bit of shock humor, in which TV chef Julia Child (Dan Akyroyd) knicks her finger with a knife and bleeds to death on camera. This tone never quite worked on the show again (especially not in the next year's "Vomitorium" sketch), but the sketch staked a flag for celebrity morbidity that was later carried by South Park. — MM
usertype:1 tt= 0

--------------------------------------------------------------
ARE WE THERE YET ?????

magna
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 4# 



Rank:Diamond Member

Status: RULER OF FIVE GALAXIES AND BOSS OF TV REMOTE
Score:7416
Posts:7416
From: Canada
Registered:12/06/2008

RE:50 BEST COMEDY SKITS OF ALL TIME
(Date Posted:06/19/2009 1:29 AM)


20. Marijuana - Fridays

The short-lived L.A. version of Saturday Night Live produced one classic moment, courtesy of guest host Andy Kaufman. In this sketch, two couples are dining at a restaurant together; each sneaks to the restroom to smoke pot without the knowledge of the others. (The overenthusiastic catcallers in the audience had obviously beaten all of them to it.) In the middle of the banal premise, Kaufman loses interest: "I can't play stoned," he says, and the sketch starts to flounder. Castmember (and future "Seinfeld" star) Michael Richards stalks offstage and returns to dump a pile of cue cards on Kaufman's lap. Kaufman throws a glass of water in his face. A crew member runs on stage; he and Kaufman proceed to fistfight; the show fades to commercial. Was it planned? Or a noble live-TV sabotage of pandering material? Later portrayed in the Kaufman biopic "Man in the Moon" (and now generally acknowledged to have been a setup), at the time the sketch drew international headlines, and it stands as testament of Kaufman's ability to provoke. —Michael Martin

19. The Olympia Restaurant - Saturday Night Live

One of the most oft-quoted sketches in SNL history, 1978's "The Olympia Restaurant" even inspired the formation of a restaurant chain. Inspired by the goings-on at the Billy Goat Tavern in Chicago, the bit is set at a Greek diner whose proprietors have a limited vocabulary and an even smaller menu. John Belushi's siren song (Cheezborger! Cheezborger!) steamrolls any other customer request. No matter the order — he always returns to that same refrain, only occasionally mixing it up with a "No Coke — Pepsi." His co-workers (and relatives) are rounded out by grill-master Dan Aykroyd and soda jerk Bill Murray. When guest host Robert Klein saunters in and asks for a couple of eggs — he's rebuked by a choral rendition — and Belushi's rapid fire response reaches the sublime. A mustachioed Murray almost steals the show, well on his way to perfecting the dumbfounded, hangdog ennui that would soon become his trademark. —R. Emmet Sweeney

18. He's Rick James - Chappelle's Show

The sketch that inspired a generation to boast "I'm Rick James, bitch!", "Chappelle's Show"'s most famous bit (and catchphrase) has at this point been run into the ground by legions of lame frat boy impressions. Nonetheless, this highlight from the Comedy Central hit's second season remains an unqualified triumph of TV-biography satire and outrageous celebrity impersonation. Cast as an episode of "Charlie Murphy's True Hollywood Stories," this series of three dramatized anecdotes about super freak Rick James thrives thanks to three key ingredients: Murphy's boastful narration, in which he repeatedly talks about putting "habitual line-stepper" James in his place through beatdowns; Chappelle's face-licking, couch-dirtying, forehead-punching performance as the flamboyantly insane James; and, of course, James himself, who refutes Murphy's tough-guy version of events ("I must be losing my mind") and candidly sums up his legendary behavior — and, perhaps, his life — with the simple maxim, "Cocaine is a hell of a drug." —Nick Schager

17. Scenes from an Idiot's Marriage - SCTV

Jerry Lewis. Ingmar Bergman. Two cinematic titans join forces in SCTV's epic parody of the European art film. Martin Short aces his Lewis impression, while Andrea Martin does a blank-faced, tear-streaked Harriet Andersson, ready to untie the knot with Jerry. The sketch is a showpiece for Short, and he doesn't disappoint: his torturous mispronunciation of Sven Gunderbloom ("Sy Hoirbensen") and earnest voice-over ("My life used to be mahvelous") add up to a brilliant representation of slapstick existentialism. The centerpiece is a 360-degree tracking shot around a dinner table, centering on Andrea Martin making out with a bearded stoneface. Then Short waltzes in and introduces the anarchic to the deadpan proceedings — a water spritzer and a bucket are the klutzy highlights of the funniest Bergman parody in recorded history. —R.E.S.

16. Buckwheat Sings - Saturday Night Live

The big, unkempt hair, the suspenders, the childlike voice — Eddie Murphy's embodiment of the famous "Our Gang" character stands as the pinnacle of the comedian's SNL run. Featuring Murphy standing on a darkened stage, the sketch — a TV commercial for the new "Buh-Weet Sings" album — is a model of less-is-more, achieving a state of pitch-perfect wackiness via the mentally challenged look in Murphy's eyes, the giant toothy grin he flashes after every song and the awkward, overdone hand gestures that accompany his riotous renditions of, among others, "Wookin' Pa Nub" and "Barbah ob Dabill" (the latter a tribute to Alfalfa). Still, what truly sells this unforgettable sketch is the future superstar's spot-on impersonation of Buckwheat's semi-incomprehensible speech, which is exaggerated for hilarious comedic effect, and also seems to contain within its hyperbole a sly critique of the 1920-1930s character's less-than-stellar representation of African-Americans. —N.S.

15. Word Association - Saturday Night Live

A masterpiece, simply put. Chevy Chase is testing Richard Pryor during a psychological profile for a janitor position, and asks him to perform some word association. The racist undertones of Chase's selections soon become full-on epithets, and the test literally escalates into a war of words (from Negro/Whitey to Tar Baby/Ofay and on and on). Brilliantly and economically written by Paul Mooney (later a regular on "Chappelle's Show"), Chase's smarm is used to its fullest expressiveness, and Pryor's performance is a marvel — his rage slowly spreading throughout his body until it centers on his trembling, apoplectic upper lip, his twitching face humbling Chase into upping his salary. There's a beautiful modulation in Pryor's performance, the transition from finger-tapping affability to dagger-stared anger is accomplished through pure physicality — it almost could have been done silent. Needless to say, such an honest and raw-nerved uncovering of racial prejudice couldn't air today — let's just be thankful it was allowed back in '75. —R.E.S.

14. Ministry of Silly Walks - Monty Python

The Pythonites knew how to deliver lunacy, but perhaps their greatest skill was in establishing the foundation for, and then slowly building upon, absurd premises. Case in point: this classic sketch, which opens with the sight of John Cleese buying a newspaper and then taking weird, gigantic steps down London's streets, and becomes increasingly funnier with each new development. Cleese arrives at his job, which a sign surprisingly informs us is at the Ministry of Silly Walks. He passes by other strangely ambling co-workers and into his office, where Michael Palin asks for help in developing his not-very-silly gait so as to receive a government grant. Cleese's ensuing demonstration is a tour-de-force of physical showmanship, his strikingly long legs bending in ways both hilarious and awe-inspiring. It's the newsreel footage of silly walks from yesteryear, however, that truly cements this sketch's status as one of Python's greatest hits. —N.S.

13. Bass-O-Matic - Saturday Night Live

Dressed in a plaid suit, mustache a-droop, Dan Akroyd sends up the Ron Popeil late night infomercials of the '70s era in this sketch from the SNL golden era. Speaking quickly and with conviction like a proper huckster, Akroyd pitches the revolutionary Revco Super Bass-o-matic '76 as the answer to our troublesome days of "scaling, cutting and gutting," while dropping fish into a blender for a murky frappe. The sketch hits us on intellectual and visceral fronts: we recoil at the pitchman, his heavy-handed technique and his off-putting, not-at-all necessary product. We discount Laraine Newman's completely and amusingly unconvincing "Wow that's terrific bass!" when she takes a swig. 30 years later, the skit harkens back to simpler times, before advertising and marketing became embedded in every aspect of our lives, when we could still click away. But then and now, the sketch remains a smooth blend of comedy, requiring only the simplest of ingredients: some plaid, a mustache and bait. Mmm. —L.O.

12. The Racial Draft - Chappelle's Show

In this inspired eight-minute sequence from the dearly departed "Chappelle's" second season, celebrities are selected by races (and, in one case, a religion) in the style of a collegiate sports draft. The ever-versatile Chappelle pulls triple-duty as a ESPNish commentator, the representative of the White Delegation ("Would you cut the malarkey!" he warns the rowdy crowd), and as Tiger Woods, the first man chosen by the Black race ("He's been discriminated against in his time, he's had death threats and he dates a white woman. Sounds like a black guy to me!" explains Chappelle). After Woods' official induction ("I've always wanted to say this: for shizzle!"), the draft takes pointed shots at Condi Rice, Madonna and O.J. Though "Chappelle's Show" had a well-deserved reputation for edgy racial humor, for all the stereotypes and epithets, this sketch, like so many others on the series, celebrates diversity and interracial tolerance even as it pokes fun at political correctness. After all, the draft's final choice, the Wu Tang Clan, show up in person to accept their selection by the Asian community, proudly announcing "Konnichiwa, bitches!" —M.S.

11. Jaws II (Land Shark) - Saturday Night Live

With the familiar bars of John Williams' "Jaws" theme music playing ominously in the background, single young women are conned into opening their doors by a land shark, "the cleverest species of them all." The land shark's mumbled lines are hardly Rico Suave-worthy, but his charm works on the ladies — and on us. Voiced by Chevy Chase, the quick-thinking predator claims to be everything from a plumber to a candygram deliveryman to get the doors to open. In one instance — the bit's height — he politely demurs, "I'm only a dolphin, ma'am" to a skeptical Laraine Newman. The special effects are equally silly: a foam rubber shark head engulfs Gilda Radner, Newman and Candice Bergen. An example of SNL at its heyday, this imagined sequel skewered current events and pop culture, but it would work even without the cuts to John Belushi as concerned sheriff Matt Hooper. The land shark would appear in other SNL skits — that there would be real "Jaws" sequels — including one in 3D — would be Hollywood's joke on us. —L.O.
usertype:1 tt= 0

--------------------------------------------------------------
ARE WE THERE YET ?????

<<Previous ThreadNext Thread>>
Page 1 / 1    
New Topic New Poll
Sign Up | Create | About Us | SiteMap | Features | Forums | Show Off | Faq | Help
Copyright © 2000-2014 Aimoo Free Forum All rights reserved.

Energy efficient LED lights, bulbs, lighting fixtures and flashlights from Lighting EVER. Better lighting, Better sense.
LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY
LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY