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Title: Celtic Gods and Goddesses
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ladymage2
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(Date Posted:05/28/2009 12:29 PM)
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The Celtic people, deeply religious, revered many pagan deities.
This held true perticularly in times when Christianity was not well established or was being revolted against.


  • Abnoba

(Gaul) Goddess of the hunt (similar to the Roman Diana)

  • Andraste

(Britain) Andraste is a warrior goddess, the goddess of victory.

  • Annwn

(Britain) The otherworld.

  • Arianrhod

(Wales) The goddess of the moon. Her palace is the Aurora Borealis.

  • Badb

One of the three war goddesses known collectively as the Morrigan. She was depicted in the form of a bird with a crimson (bloody) mouth.

  • Belatucadros

(Britain) God of war and of the destruction. His name means "fair shining one". The Romans equated him with their god Mars.

  • Belenus (Bel or Belenos)

(Gaul) God of light, and referred to as "The Shining One". He is in charge of the welfare of sheep and cattle. His wife is the goddess Belisama. They can be compared with Apollo and Minerva.

  • Belisama

(Celtic) Goddess of light and fire, the forge and of crafts. She is the wife of the god Belenus.

  • Boann

(Irish) Boann is the goddess of rivers and fertility.

  • Borvo

(Gaul) God of healing.

  • Bres

(Gaelic) God of fertility and agriculture; one of the first kings of the Tuatha De Danaan.

  • Brighid (Brigit)

(Gaelic) Brighid was the goddess of fertility, therapy, metalworking, and poetic inspiration. She is the wife of Bres. She is known as Caridwen (Cerridwen) in Wales.

  • Cenn Cruaich

(Gaelic) The heaven-god (akin to Zeus).

  • Cernunnos

(Gaul) Cernunnos was the god of the underworld and of animals. The horned god of virility, he is accompanied by a ram-headed serpent and a stag.

  • Cerridwen

(Wales) Cerridwen is the goddess of dark prophetic powers. She is the keeper of the cauldron of the underworld, in which inspiration and divine knowledge are brewed.

  • Cliodna

(Gaelic) Goddess of beauty and the otherworld.

  • Cocidius

(Britain) God associated sometimes with forests and hunting (linked with the Roman god Silvanus), sometimes with war (equated with Mars).

  • Condatis

(Britain) God who personified the waters.

  • Coventina

(Britain) Goddess who personified a holy spring that had healing powers.

  • Creidhne

(Celtic) Creidhne was the god of metal working. One of the trio of craft-gods of the Tuatha De Danaan, as were Goibhniu and Luchta.

  • Cuda

(Britain) Mother goddess.

  • Dagda (Cian)

(Celtic) The god who was the supreme head of the People of Dana. (The equivalent of Cronus.) Dagda possesses a bottomless cauldron of plenty and rules the seasons with the music of his harp. With his mighty club Dagda can slay nine men with a single blow, and with its small end he can bring them back to life.

  • Daghdha

(Irish) Daghdha is the leader of the gods. He has a secret affair with Boann which results in the birth of Oenghus.

  • Damona

(Gaul) Goddess of fertility and healing; her name means "divine cow".

  • Dana (Danu)

(Celtic) The goddess from whom Tuatha Dé Danann (The People of Dana) were descended. She was the daughter of the god Dagda (the Good), and had three sons, who had only one son between them, Ecne (Knowledge). She was another of the three war goddesses known collectively as the Morrigan.

  • Dewi

(Wales) The Red Dragon god. The emblem of Wales.

  • Diancecht

(Irish) Diancecht is the god of healing. He killed the giant serpent that was destroying cattle throughout the land. He also killed his own son whose skill in healing endangered his father's reputation.

  • Dön

(There are two differing versions of Celtic Mythology with one of them probably based on the Welsh people's tales.)
1. Don, the mother goddess; the Welsh equivalent of the Irish Danu.
2. According to the predominant story, Dön was the leader of one of the two warring families of gods. His children were the powers of light, the other family's children were the powers of darkness.

  • Epona

(Celtic) The horse goddess. Usually portrayed as riding a mare, sometimes with a foal.

  • Esus

(Gaul) God equated with either Roman deity Mars or Mercury. Human sacrifices to Esus were hanged and skewered with a sword. Esus is usually pictured as a woodcutter.

  • Fodla

(Gaelic)One of the trio of goddesses who lent their name to Ireland. The other two were Banbha and Eriu.

  • Geofon

(Britain)She was the ocean goddess.

  • Goibhniu

(Celtic) Goibhniu was the smith god. One of three craft-gods of the Tuatha De Danaan. The other two were Luchta and Creidhne.

  • Govannon

(Wales) God of smiths and metalworkers. The weapons he makes are deadly in their aim, the armor unfailing in its protection. Those who drink from his sacred cup need no longer fear old age and infirmity.

  • Gwyn ap Nudd

(Wales) Gwyn ap Nudd is the Lord of the Underworld and master of the wild hunt.

  • Latis

(Britain) Goddess associated with water.

  • Lir (Llyr)

(Wales) God of the sea.

  • Lleu

(Wales) The god who is the Welsh equivalent of the Irish Lugh. He was pictured as young, strong, radiant with hair of gold, master of all arts, skills and crafts.

  • Luchtaine

(Celtic) He was the god of wheel making.

  • Lugh

(Irish) The sun god. Also known as Lugh of the Long Arm. He killed his grandfather, Balor, during a battle in which the new order of gods and goddesses took over from the primal gods.

  • Mabon

(Celtic) The Son of Light (akin to the Roman Apollo). He was the god of liberation, harmony, music and unity.

  • Mac Da Tho

(Irish) A god of the otherworld.

  • Macha

(Irish) The third of the three war goddesses known as the Morrigan. Macha feeds on the heads of slain enemies.

  • Manannan mac Lir

(Celtic) The god of the ocean.

  • Math ap Mathonwy

(Wales) God of sorcery.

  • Modron

(Wales) Goddess whose name means "divine mother".

  • Morrigan

(Irish) High Queen and goddess of the Tuatha Dé Danann. She was a trinity; Macha, Badb, and Neman, all three bloodthirsty and feared by the enemies of the Tuatha Dé Danann. As Macha she was goddess of war and fertility who could take the shape of a crow. As Badb (Nechtan) she was the water-god whose sacred well was a source of knowledge. As Neman (Nemhain) she was the goddess of war and battle.

  • Nantosuelta

(Gaul) Goddess of nature; the wife of Sucellus.

  • Nehalennia

(Gaul) Goddess of the sea.

  • Nodens

(Britain) God of healing, akin to the Irish god Nuadu.

  • Nuada

(Irish) Nuada of the Silver Hand. He lost his hand in the war against the Firbolgs (for control of Ireland), and it was replaced by a hand crafted of silver, by one of the metalsmiths of the defeated Firbolgs.

  • Oenghus (Angus)

(Irish) He is the son of Daghdha and Boann. He is the god of fatal love (akin to Cupid). Angus' kisses turn into singing birds, and the music he plays draws all who hear it to his side.

  • Ogmios (Ogma)

(Gaul) He was the god of poetry, charm and incantation. He is shown as an old man with wrinkles, carrying a club and a bow. From his tongue hang fine gold chains attached to the ears of his eager followers.

  • Rhiannon

(Wales) Believed to be the Welsh counterpart of Gaulish horse goddess Epona. Her son, Pryderi, succeeded his father Pwyll as the ruler of Dyfed and of the otherworld.

  • Rosmerta

(Gaul) Goddess who was the native consort of the Roman Mercury; her name means "great provider".

  • Sirona

(Gaul) Another goddess of healing.

  • Sucellus

(Gaul) God of agriculture and forests and a hammer god. His consort is Nantosvelta.

  • Sulis

(Britain) Goddess of healing, she is akin to the Roman goddess Minerva.

  • Taranis

(Gaul) God whose name means "thunderer". Taranis is the god of the wheel, associated with forces of change.

  • Teutates
  • Vitiris

(Britain) God of wisdom.


This webpage was created by
Steven A. Culbreath
Last revised: April 11, 2004
http://www.celticgrounds.com/chapters/c-deities.htm
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