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Title: Wortcunning- (The Healing Arts)
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Autumn_Heather
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(Date Posted:02/13/2009 06:29 AM)
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Wortcunning- (The Healing Arts)



Warning: All herbs and plants are potentially lethal! The information provided on this website is not intended to replace prescriptions or the information of a qualified healthcare provider. This information is for your personal consideration only. I am not a medical doctor and cannot legally diagnose or treat any type of disease or illness under such a title. All information here must be used, considered, and endorsed on an individual basis and by personal consideration, and/or conviction.

Notable Liquid Measures:

1 Minim = 60 Drams 1 Dram = 1/8 Ounce 8 Drams = 1 Ounce

Notable Measures of Mass (solids or powders):

7000 Grains = 1 Pound 1 Pound = 16 Ounces 1 Ounce = 437.5 Grains 1 Grain = 15.4 Grams

453.6 Grams = 1 Pound 28.35 Grams = 1 Ounce 109.4 Grains = ¼ Ounce 54.7 Grains = 1/8 Ounce

1 Grain = 64.7 Milligrams

Preparatory Terms:

Bath: Make a tincture from the herb and pour it into water to bathe it.
Compress: To do this take some linen and soak it in a tincture of the herb then apply it to the wound.
Decoction: This is the same as an infusion, but it requires more heat to extract from the roots, bark, seeds, etc. Infusion: This is commonly referred to as tea; it is the raw herb boiled in water.
Liniments: This is an infusion that is to be applied and rubbed into the skin.
Macerate: Macerate the herb by crushing, beating, chopping, tearing, etc to gain access to its cell structure. This will create a rapid release of the herbal chemical into the liquid. Macerated herbs are often applied directly on the skin as a poultice. Note that dried herbs may be used similarly.
Oil: The raw herb is either steeped in extra virgin olive oil for a period of a month or heated in oil, and then the herb is removed. . If you are mixing in oils, almond, grape, sesame, or other very pure vegetable oils are best to use. Use extreme caution in heating oils, they do not have the same boiling point as water and are often flammable, bursting into fire or smoking badly when too hot. It is best to heat oils in a double pot or in a larger pan of water, keeping the oil temperature to a safe level.
Ointment: Make this by melting 2 ounces of white wax with 3 ounces of lard, and add 3 ounces of whatever herb in oil form.
Poultice: Lightly boil the raw herb and place it on a wound. Wrap the area in linen. Tincture: Take the herb and steep it in a jar of either liquor or apple cider vinegar for two weeks.

Astrological Planting:

Waxing Moon: at this time plant leafy annuals that produce their yield above ground, such as: asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, cress, endive, kohlrabi, lettuce, parsley, spinach, etc.

Full Moon: during this time plant vine annuals that produce their yield above ground, such as: beans, eggplant, melons, peas, peppers, pumpkins, squash, tomatoes, etc.

Waning Moon: now is the time to plant biennials, perennials, bulb, and root plants. Also, plant trees, shrubs, berries, beets, carrots, onions, parsnips, peanuts, potatoes, radishes, rhubarb, rutabagas, strawberries, turnips, winter wheat, grapes, etc.

New Moon: this is the best time to cultivate, turn sod, pull weeds, and destroy pests of all kinds, especially when the moon is in the barren signs of Aries, Leo, Virgo, Gemini, Aquarius, and Sagittarius.

Moon in Aries: Barren and dry, fiery and masculine. Used for destroying noxious growths, weeds, pests, etc., and for cultivating. Don't plant seeds.

Moon in Taurus: Productive and moist, earthy and feminine. Used for planting many crops, particularly potatoes and root crops, and when hardiness is important. Also used for lettuce, cabbage, and similar leafy vegetables.

Moon in Gemini: Barren and dry, airy and masculine. Used for destroying noxious growths, weeds and pests, and for cultivation.

Moon in Cancer: Very fruitful and moist, watery and feminine. This is the most productive sign, used extensively for planting and irrigation. Good for planting any seeds.

Moon in Leo: Barren and dry, fiery and masculine. This is the most barren sign, used only for killing weeds and for cultivation.

Moon in Virgo: Barren and moist, earthy and feminine. Good for cultivation and destroying weeds and pests. Good for all garden chores other than planting.

Moon in Libra: Semi-fruitful and moist, airy and masculine. Used for planting many crops and producing good pulp growth and roots. This is also a very good sign for flowers and vines. Also used for seeding hay, corn fodder, etc.

Moon in Scorpio: Very fruitful and moist, watery and feminine. Used for the same purposes as Cancer, especially good for vine growth and sturdiness.

Moon in Sagittarius: Barren and dry, fiery and masculine. Used for planting onions, seeding hay, and for cultivation.

Moon in Capricorn: Productive and dry, earthy and feminine. Used for the planting potatoes, tubers, etc.

Moon in Aquarius: Barren and dry, airy and masculine. Used for cultivation and destroying noxious growths, weeds, and pests. Limit garden chores to weeding and cleanup.

Moon in Pisces: Very fruitful and moist, watery and feminine. Good for planting all seeds. Used along with Cancer and Scorpio, especially good for root growth.

Basic Growing Instructions:

Storing seeds: Wrap the seeds in several layers of coffee filters to absorb the moisture, and put them in a jar in the refrigerator.
Germinating: Pour your seeds into a jar, making sure to use different jars for each different kind of seeds, cover in water and set in the refrigerator. Every day for 2 weeks, strain out the water and add new. At the end of two weeks, any seeds that are floating are no good and should be thrown out.
Potting: Use trays and make sure you mark the different trays if you are growing more than one kind of plant, and then cover the seeds (three together) lightly with a layer of seed-starting potting soil. Keep the trays at a place where no animal will disturb them and water them daily. When sprigs start to show through, check to see if the plants you are growing enjoy full or partial sun and move the trays accordingly.
Transplanting: When the sprigs have grown to a hardy size, transplant them to the area you wish by using some kind of transplanting soil. Continue to water daily, unless otherwise indicated by the species of plant you are growing.

Additional Instructions:

The gathering of the herb is traditionally done on the night of the full moon with a white-handled, curved blade called a bolline. Ideally, the plant is taken when it is blooming.

After you cut the herb, you can either hang it upside down in some corner of the room to let it dry, or you can spread them thinly on a screen and let them dry in the full sun. Also, you can spread them thinly on a cookie sheet and cook them on a very low temperature till the herbs become are dry
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Autumn_Heather
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RE:Wortcunning- (The Healing Arts)
(Date Posted:02/13/2009 06:29 AM)

Medical Terminology and Herbal Treatments

Adaptogenic: Helping the human organism adapt to stressful conditions: Asian Ginseng, American Ginseng, Siberian Ginseng and Licorice.
Amenorrhea: Absence or suppression of menstruation: Angelica, Black Cohosh, Blue Cohosh, Cotton Root Bark, Parsley, Pennyroyal, Tansy and Yellow Cedar.
Analgesic: A pain-relieving medicine. Same as an aphrodisiac: White Willow (bark), Devils Claw, Chamomile and Rosemary.Anhydrotic: Stops sweating: Sage.
Anodyne: A pain-relieving medicine, milder than analgesic: Catnip, Skullcap and Valerian.
Antacid: Neutralizes the acid produced by the stomach: Apple (juice), Fig, Ground Ivy and Mint.
Anthelmintic: An agent that destroys and expels worms from the intestines. Same as vermifuge: Aloe, Garlic, Pomegranate, Tansy, Wormwood and Rue.
Anti-aphrodisiac: Suppressing sexual desire: Chaste Tree, Lavender and Water Lily.
Antibacterial: Destroys or stops the growth of bacteria: Echinacea, Garlic and Poke (root).
Antibilious: An herb that combats biliousness. The term biliousness refers to a group of symptoms consisting of nausea, abdominal discomfort, headache, constipation, and gas that are caused by an excessive secretion of bile: Balmony, Barberry, Dandelion, Golden Seal, Mugwort, Vervain, Wild Yam and Wormwood.
Antibiotic: An agent that inhibits the growth or multiplication of, or kills, a living organism; usually used in reference to bacteria or other microorganisms: Garlic, Echinacea, Chinese Ginseng, Licorice (root) and Wild Indigo.
Anti-convulsant: Reducing or relieving convulsions or cramps: Blue Cohosh, Camphor, Lady’s Slipper, Linden, Mistletoe, Passion Flower, Peony, Skullcap, Sweet Violet, Thorn Apple and Bedstraw.
Anti-emetic: Prevents or alleviates nausea and vomiting: Balm, Black Horehound, Cloves, Dill, Fennel and Ginger (root).
Anti-epileptic: An agent that combats the convulsions or seizures of epilepsy: Blue Cohosh, Camphor, Lady’s Slipper, Linden, Mistletoe, Passion Flower, Peony, Skullcap, Sweet Violet, Thorn Apple and Bedstraw.
Antifungal: An agent that inhibits the growth or multiplication of fungi, or kills them outright: Galangal.
Antigalactagogue: Prevents or decreases secretion of milk: Sage and Black Walnut.
Anti-histaminic: Neutralizing the effect or inhibiting production of histamine: Nettle, Eyebright, Horsetail, Ground Ivy, and Plantain.
Anti-inflammatory: Reducing or neutralizing inflammation: White Willow (bark), Bogbean, Chamomile, Devil’s Claw, Marigold, St Johns Wort, White Poplar (leaves) and Witch Hazel.
Anti-lithic: Aids in preventing the formation of stones in the kidneys and bladder: Bearberry, Corn (silk), Couchgrass, Gravelroot, Parsley, Sea Holly and Wild Carrot.
Anti-microbial: An agent that inhibits the growth or multiplication of microorganisms, or kills them: Cyan, Clove, Garlic, Juniper, Marigold, Myrrh, Peppermint, Plantain, Rue and Sage.
Anti-oxidant: Preventing oxidation; a preservative: Bilberry, Garlic, Ginger, St Johns Wort, Rosemary, Milk Thistle, Peppermint, Green Tea Tree and Grape (seeds).
Anti-parasitical: Destructive to parasites: Aloe, Garlic, Pomegranate, Tansy, Wormwood and Rue.
Anti-periodic: Prevents the periodic recurrence of attacks of a disease, as in malaria: Barberry and Green Tea.
Anti-phlogistic: An agent that counteracts inflammation: White Willow (bark), Bogbean, Chamomile, Devil’s Claw, Marigold, St Johns Wort, White Poplar (leaves) and Witch Hazel.
Anti-pyretic: Reduces fever. Same as febrifuge or refrigerant: Aloe and Ginger.
Anti-rheumatic: An agent that relieves or cures rheumatism: White Willow (bark), Nettle, Horsetail, Bitch (leaves), Cottonwood and Dandelion (root and herb).
Anti-scorbutic: An agent effective against scurvy: Pine and Lime.
Antiseptic: Preventing sepsis, decay, and putrefaction; also, an agent that kills germs, microbes: Lemon, Lime, Grapefruit and Orange.
Anti-spasmodic: Preventing or relieving spasms or cramps: Licorice, Peppermint, Spearmint, Black Cohosh, Evening Primrose, Lobelia, Motherwort and Nettle.
Anti-syphilitic: Herbs that improve or cure syphilis. Also called antileutic: Black Pepper, Cedar, Butchers Broom, American Spikenard, Iris (blue), Myrrh, Sassafras and Yellow Dock.
Anti-tumor: Preventing or effective against tumors or cancers: Dandelion, Ash, Blessed Thistle, Clivers, Fenugreek, Goldenseal, Mayapple, Mistletoe and Poke (root).
Antitussive: Preventing or relieving cough: Mullein and Coltsfoot.
Anti-venomous: Acts against poisonous matter from animals and snakes: Pennyroyal and Skullcap.
Antiviral: An agent that inhibits growth or multiplication of viruses, or kills them: Aloe, Lysine, Licorice, Lemon Balm, Astragals, Garlic, Goldenseal, Juniper and Ginger.
Antizymotic: Herbs that can destroy disease-producing organisms: Aloe, Garlic, Pomegranate, Tansy, Wormwood and Rue. Aperient: Causes a gentle bowel movement: Rhubarb and Prune.
Aphrodisiac: Increasing or exciting sexual desire: Damiana, Horny Goat Weed, Ginseng and Yohimbe.
Astringent: An agent that causes tissue to contract: Ground Ivy, Oak (bark), Witch Hazel and Yarrow.
Calmative: An agent with mild sedative or calming effects: Chamomile and Lavender.
Cardioactive: Affecting the heart: Broom, Bugleweed, Cyan, Hawthorn and Motherwort.
Carminative: An agent that relieves and removes gas from the digestive system: Fennel, Flax and Dill.
Cathartic: A powerful purgative or laxative, causing severe evacuation, with or without pain: Prunes, Olive, Senna, Castor and Aloe.
Cholagogue: An agent that increases bile flow to the intestines: Balmony, Barberry, Dandelion, Golden Seal and Wild Yam.Counterirritant: An agent that produces inflammation or irritation when applied locally to affect another, usually irritated surface to stimulate circulation: Mustard, Cyan and Club Moss.
Demulcent: An agent that is locally soothing and softening: Coltsfoot, Lungwort, Licorice, Mallow, Mullein and Slippery Elm (bark).
Demulcent febrifuge: Reduces heat while building bodily fluids: Coltsfoot, Comfrey, Corn (silk), Couch Grass, Flaxseed, Irish Moss, Icelandic Moss, Licorice, Lungwort, Marshmallow, Mullein and Slippery Elm.
Deobstruent: Removes obstructions by opening natural passages or pores of the body: Butchers Broom and Prickly Ash.Depurative: Tends to purify and cleanse the blood. Same as blood purifier: Chicory, Angelica, and Burdock (root).
Detergent: An agent that cleanses boils, sores, wounds, etc.: Willows.
Detoxicant: Removes toxins: Licorice, Elder (berries), Soy and Corn (silk).
Diaphoretic: An agent that induces sweating: Bayberry, Black Cohosh, Boneset, Cyan, Elder and Yarrow.
Digestant: Contains substances (i.e. ferments, acids) that aid in digestion: Coriander and Cumin.
Digestive: An agent that promotes digestion: Coriander and Cumin.
Discutient: An agent that dissolves or causes something, such as a tumor, to disappear. Also called discussive: Arnica, Tobacco and Wheat.
Diuretic: An agent that induces urination: Clivers, Dandelion, Bladderwrack, Green Tea, Pumpkin (seed) and Yarrow.Drastic: A violent purgative: Ipecac.
Emetic: An agent that induces vomiting: Ipecac, Lobelia and Licorice.
Emmenagogue: A substance that promotes or assists the flow of menstrual fluid: Bethroot, Black Cohosh, Blue Cohosh, Blessed Thistle, False Unicorn (root), Motherwort, and Pennyroyal.
Emollient: An agent that softens and soothes the skin when applied locally: Borage, Chickweed, Coltsfoot, Comfrey, Licorice, Mallow, Mullein, Plantain and Rose (petals).
Estrogenic: A substance that induces female hormonal activity: Soy and Blue Cohosh.
Exanthematous: Refers to any eruptive disease or fever. An herbal remedy for skin eruptions such as measles, scarlet fever, etc: Elder (berry), Oat (straw), Lemon Balm, Peppermint and Licorice.
Expectorant: An agent that induces the removal (coughing up) of mucous secretions from the lungs: Coltsfoot, Garlic, Hyssop, Mallow, Lungwort, Skunk Cabbage and Mullein.
Febrifuge: That which reduces fever. Same as antipyretic or refrigerant: Blessed Thistle, Boneset, Borage, Eucalyptus, Peppermint, Plantain and Raspberry.
Fungicidal: An agent that kills fungi: Myrrh, Tea Tree and Garlic.
Galactagogue: Promotes secretion of milk: Anise, Blessed Thistle, Fennel, Goat’s Rue, Raspberry, Basil and Vervain.Hepatic: An herb that promotes the well-being of the liver and increases the secretion of bile: Clivers, Dandelion, Fennel, Golden Seal, Horseradish, Motherwort, Prickly Ash, Wild Yam, Wormwood, Yarrow and Yellow Dock.
Herpatic: A remedy for skin eruptions, ringworm, etc: Tea Tree and Walnut.
Hydrogogue: Promotes watery evacuation of bowels: Mandrake and White Byrony.
Hypertensive: Causing or marking a rise in blood pressure: Licorice.
Hypnotic: Tends to produce sleep: Hops, Jamaican Dogwood, Mistletoe, Passion Flower, Skullcap, Valerian and Wild Lettuce.
Hypotensive: Causing or marking a lowering of blood pressure: Hawthorn, Lobelia, Olive, Monkshood, Arnica, Hellebore and Mistletoe.
Immunostimulant: Stimulating various functions or activities of the immune system: Echinacea and Garlic.
Laxative: A mild purgative. An herb that acts to promote evacuation of the bowels: Buckthorn, Burdock, Flax (seed), Rhubarb, Castor, Cascara Sagrada and Senna.
Lithotriptic: Causing the dissolution or destruction of stones in the bladder or kidneys: Barberry, Corn (silk), Dandelion (root), Devil’s Claw, Gravelroot, Horsetail, Juniper (berry), Marshmallow and Parsley.
Maturating: An agent that promotes the maturing or bringing to a head of boils, carbuncles, etc.: Echinacea and Fig.Mydriatic: Dilates the pupil: Belladonna.
Narcotic: An addicting substance that reduces pain and produces sleep: Kava, Damiana, Lobelia and Skullcap.
Nauseant: An herb that causes nausea and vomiting. Somewhat similar to an emetic: Ipecac and Mustard.
Nervine: An agent that affects, strengthens, or calms the nerves: Damiana, Licorice and Skullcap.
Nutrient or Nutritive: Nourishing, increases weight and density: Nettle, Dandelion, Flax (seed), Burdock, Alfalfa, Red Clover and Spirulina.
Ophthalmic or Ophthalmicum: Healing for disorders and diseases of the eye: Eyebright and Goldenseal.
Oxytocic: stimulate the contraction of the uterus and can thereby help in childbirth: Bethroot, Blue Cohosh, Golden Seal, Rue and Squaw Vine.
Panacea: An agent good for what ails you, or what doesn't ail you. A "cure-all.”: Grapefruit (seed), Ginsengs and Garlic.Parturient: A substance that induces and promotes labor: Black Cohosh, Blue Cohosh and Squawvine.
Pectoral: Relieves disorders of the chest and lungs, as an expectorant: Coltsfoot, Garlic, Hyssop, Mallow, Lungwort, Skunk Cabbage and Mullein.
Prophylactic: Agent that wards off disease: Bladderwrack, Chickweed, Green Walnut, Garlic, Echinacea and Goldenseal.Purgative: An agent that causes cleansing or watery evacuation of the bowels, usually with griping (painful cramps): Ipecac and Mustard.
Refrigerant: Relieves fever and thirst. A cooling remedy. Lowers body temperature: Aloe and Ginger.
Relaxant: Tends to relax and relieve tension, especially muscular tension: Hops, Jamaican Dogwood, Mistletoe, Passion Flower, Skullcap, Valerian and Wild Lettuce.
Resolvent: Promotes the resolving and removing of abnormal growths, such as a tumor: St Johns Wort, Mandrake and Indian Strawberry.
Rubefacient: An agent that causes reddening or irritation when applied to the skin: Cyan, Cloves, Garlic, Ginger, Horseradish, Mustard and Nettle.
Sedative: Calms the nerves, allays excitement, induces relaxation, and is conducive to sleep: Cowslips, Jamaican Dogwood, Lobelia, Passion Flower, Red Poppy, Skullcap, Valerian, Wild Lettuce, Wild Yam and Kava.
Sialagogue: Promotes the flow of saliva: Bloodroot, Ginger and Prickly Ash.
Soporific: Herbs that help to produce sleep, same as a hypnotic: Hops, Jamaican Dogwood, Mistletoe, Passion Flower, Skullcap, Valerian and Wild Lettuce.
Stimulant: An agent that causes increased activity of another agent, cell, tissue, organ, or organism: Ephedra and Tobacco.
Stomachic: Substances which give strength and tone to the stomach. It is used to stimulate the appetite: Cumin and Senna.Sudorific: Herbs that cause heavy perspiration: Ephedra, Garlic, Coltsfoot (leaf), Chamomile and Hyssop.
Vasoconstrictor: An agent that causes blood vessels to constrict, or narrow the caliber: Witch Hazel, Ephedra, Butchers Broom, Yohimbe, Goldenseal and Bugleweed.
Vasodepressant: Lowers blood pressure by dilatation of blood vessels; having a depressing influence on circulation: Skullcap, Wood Betony, Black Cohosh, Corn (silk), Clivers, Goldenseal, Mistletoe, Rue and Sassafras.
Vasodilator: An agent that causes blood vessels to relax and dilate: Skullcap, Wood Betony, Black Cohosh, Corn (silk), Clivers, Goldenseal, Mistletoe, Rue and Sassafras.
Vermicidal: Having worm-killing properties; an agent that kills worms; a vermifuge. Also Vermicide: Aloe, Garlic, Pomegranate, Tansy, Wormwood and Rue.
Vermifuge: Having worm-killing properties; an agent that kills worms: Aloe, Garlic, Pomegranate, Tansy, Wormwood and Rue.
Vesicant: An agent that causes blistering: Poison Ivy, Buttercup and Clematis.
Vulnerary: An agent or herb used for healing wounds, fresh cuts, etc., usually used as a poultice: Aloe, Arnica, Black Willow, Burdock, Chickweed, Clivers, Daisy, Irish Moss, Marigold, Marshmallow, Plantain, Poke (root), Slippery Elm, Witch Hazel and Wood Betony.

Medical Conditions and Herbal Treatments:

Acne: Cleavers, Burdock (root), Yellow Dock, Oregon Grape and Black Walnut (hulls).
Adrenal Gland: Golden Seal (root), Juniper (berries), Cedar (berry), Dandelion (root), Bistort, Licorice (root) and Huckleberry.
Age Spots: Milk Thistle (seeds).
Alcoholism: Grape (seed) and Fringe Tree.
Allergies: Garlic, Astragalus, Echinacea, Ginseng, Wild Cherry (bark), Mullein (leaf) and Horehound.
Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Ginkgo, Ginseng and Butchers Broom.
Anemia: Nettle, Parsley (root), Yellow Dock, Dandelion (root), Gentian and Watercress.
Anorexia: Ginger (root) and Peppermint.
Arteriosclerosis: Cats Claw, Burdock, Yellow Dock, Horsetail and Sage.
Arthritis and Rheumatism: Cats Claw, Olive (leaf), Grape (seed), Alfalfa, Boneset, Burdock (root), Cyan, Devil’s Claw, Nettle, Prickly Ash (bark), White Willow (bark), Yucca, Aloe, Garlic and Flax (seed).
Asthma: Blood Root, St. John's Wort, Mullein, Saw Palmetto, Wild Cherry Bark, Goldenseal Root, Cayenne, Comfrey and Lobelia.
Athletes Foot: Cinnamon and Burdock.
Backache: Arnica.
Balding: Yellow Dock, Sage, Yarrow, Rosemary and Lemon (peel).
Bee Stings: Black Cohosh, Echinacea, Plantain and Yellow Dock.
Bilious: Barberry, Black Walnut (hulls) and Dandelion (root).
Bladder: Cleavers, Horsetail, Shepard’s Purse and Marshmallow.
Bone Cartilage Tissue: Alfalfa, Horsetail, Oat (straw), and Comfrey (leaf).
Bowels and Colon: Slippery Elm, Bay (leaf), Senna (leaf) and Turkey Rhubarb.
Bronchitis and Pneumonia: Cats Claw, Echinacea, Horehound, Wild Cherry (bark) and Peach (leaf).
Bruises: Comfrey, Cyan and Hyssop.
Cancer: Venus flytrap, Cats Claw and Mistletoe.
Candidacies: Garlic, Black Walnut, Oregon Grape and Chamomile.
Circulation: Butchers Broom, Cyan and Ginkgo Biloba.
Cold and Cancer Soars: Echinacea, Golden Seal, Aloe, Clover and Burdock (root).
Colds and Flu: Astragalus, Echinacea, Golden Seal, Ginger, Green Tea and Slippery Elm.
Cholesterol: Cyan, Ginger and Garlic.
Colic: Caraway (seed), Thyme and Wild Yam.
Constipation: Senna (leaf), Licorice (root), Turkey Rhubarb and Buckthorn (bark), and Fern.
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Astragalus, Ginseng, Licorice (root), Tulip Poplar (bark), Echinacea, Garlic and Oat.
Depression: Oat (straw) and St Johns Wort.
Diabetes: Dandelion (root), Eyebright, Garlic, Ginger, Ginseng, Blueberry, Ginkgo, Hawthorn and Nettle.
Diarrhea: Slippery Elm, Borage (leaf), Barberry, Ginger (root), Plantain, Red Raspberry, St Johns Wort, Thyme, Tansy, Witch Hazel, Wormwood and Bistort.
Dysmenorrhea: Corn (silk), Green Tea, Aloe and Dandelion.
Ear Infection: Ginkgo Biloba, Bilberry, Echinacea, Cats Claw, Skullcap and Kava (root).
Eczema: Strawberry (leaf), Licorice (root), Black Walnut (hulls), Burdock, Dandelion (root), Plantain, Wormwood, Chamomile and Chickweed.
Edema: Dandelion (root), Peach (bark), Watermelon (seed), Parsley, Gravel Root, Kelp and Parsley (root).
Endometriosis: White Willow (bark), Chaste, Dandelion (root), Motherwort and Prickly Ash.
Energy: American Ginseng and Siberian Ginseng.
Eyes: Eyebright, Chamomile, Yellow Dock, Marshmallow (root), Golden Seal (root), Passion Flower (flower), Bilberry and Ginkgo Biloba.
Fever: Garlic, Cyan, Licorice (root), Eucalyptus (leaf), Thyme, White Poplar (bark) and White Willow (bark).
Gall Stones: Milk Thistle, Golden Seal, Oregon Grape, Dandelion and Gravel root.
Gastrointestinal: Aloe, Chamomile, Fennel, Ginger, Oats and Licorice.
Headaches: Valerian, Skullcap, Feverfew, Ginger and White Willow (bark).
Hemorrhoids: Aloe, Marshmallow, Slippery Elm, Witch Hazel and Plantain.
Hepatitis: Dandelion (root), Burdock (root), Evening Primrose, Clover, Echinacea, Oregon Grape (root), Barberry, Yellow Dock and Milk Thistle.
Hypertension: Devils Claw, Ginseng, Golden Seal, Hawthorn, Licorice and Yohimbe.
Impotence: Saw Palmetto, Flax (seed), Pumpkin (seed), Damiana, Yohimbe, Ginseng and Horny Goat Weed.
Insomnia: Hops, Passion Flower, Skullcap, Valerian (root), Blue Vervain and Ladyslipper.
Itching: Oat (straw) and Jewelweed (leaf).
Jaundice: Poke (root), Tansy, Black Cohosh, Dandelion (root), Hops, Mustard (seed), Parsley (root) and Yellow Dock. Kidney: Dandelion (leaf), Echinacea and Corn (silk).
Liver: Flax (seed), Milk Thistle, Fringe Tree, Bilberry and Yellow Dock.
Low Blood Pressure: Cyan, Ginger (root), Ginkgo Biloba, Butchers Broom, Dandelion (root), Yellow Dock, Yarrow and Kelp.
Lungs: Mullein (leaf) and Coltsfoot.
Lupus: Aloe, Cats Claw, Flax (seed) and Black Walnut.
Lymphatic: Burdock (root), Clover, Echinacea, Dandelion, Yellow Dock and Garlic.
Memory: Ginkgo Biloba, Flax (Seed) and Bilberry.
Menopause: Borage (leaf), Dong Quai, Wild Yam, Alfalfa, Black Cohosh, Blessed Thistle and Chaste Tree.
Menstrual Cramps: Black Cohosh and Motherwort, Dong Quai, Wild Yam and Black Haw.
Migraine: Ladyslipper and Feverfew.
Morning Sickness: Alfalfa, Ginger (root), Cinnamon (bark), Peppermint, Cyan, Red Raspberry and Kelp.
Mouth: Bayberry, White Oak (bark), Black Walnut (hulls), Cyan and Myrrh.
Muscles: Arnica, Lobelia, Wild Lettuce, White Willow (bark) and Valerian.
Nausea: Alfalfa, Black Cohosh, Blood Root, Blueberry (leaf), Huckleberry, Peppermint, Cinnamon (bark) and Ginger (root). Obesity: Green Tea and Bladderwrack.
Osteoporosis: Burdock, Nettle, Dandelion and Oat (straw).
Parasites: Garlic, Golden Seal, Black Walnut and Mullein.
Phobias: Valerian, Lady’s Slipper, Skullcap, Oat and Kava. PMS: Dong Quai and Dandelion (root).
Prostate: Saw Palmetto, Nettle, Marshmallow, Flax (seed), Ginseng, Licorice (root), Corn (silk), Hydrangea (root) and Pumpkin (seed).
Respiratory: Garlic, Mullein and Easter Lily.
Ring Worms: Garlic and Black Walnut (hull).
Sinusitis: Peppermint and Elder (flower).
Skin Cancer: Bloodroot.
Sore Throat: Sage, Bistort, Cyan, Witch Hazel, Poke (root), Comfrey, Garlic, Ginger (root) and Horehound.
Spasms: Mistletoe and Lobelia.
Spleen: Chamomile, Dandelion (root), Yellow Dock and Parsley (root).
Stomach Ache: Ginger (root) and Licorice (root).
Stomach Bleeding: Cyan, Marigold, Yarrow, Shepard’s Purse and Kelp.
Stress: Borage (leaf), Ladyslipper, Lobelia, Valerian and Passion Flower.
Swelling: Burdock and Comfrey.
Toxic Shock: Ginseng, Cyan, Ginger and Hawthorn.
Urinary Tract Infection: Golden Seal, Garlic, Marshmallow and Corn (silk).
Urinary Tract Infection Pain: Golden Seal, Oregon Grape (root) and Barberry (bark).
Varicose Veins: Cyan, Kelp, Garlic, Plantain and White Oak (bark).
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Autumn_Heather
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Rank:Diamond Member

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Posts:5631
From: USA
Registered:11/21/2008

RE:Wortcunning- (The Healing Arts)
(Date Posted:02/13/2009 06:30 AM)

Personal Care, Hygiene, and Herbs:

Acne Powder: Mix and powder a combination of any of the following herbs to apply to the face:
Job's Tears seeds
Red Peony root
Goldenthread root
Licorice root
Elecampane root
Marigold flowers
Elder flowers
Speedwell
Dandelion
Red Sage root

Aftershave: Steep Bay leaves in rum for a week. For sensitive skin, simply use Aloe Vera gel.

Basic Lip Balm: 2.5 oz. oil 1/2 oz. beeswax Heat together in a double boiler, mix and pour into container to cool.

Body Scrub: 2/3 c. flaxseed (for dry skin) or gape seeds (for dry skin) 1/3 c. oatmeal or wheat powder 1/4 c. yogurt
Blend well and scrub body with a loofa.

Dandruff Wash: Add 10 drops of Rosemary oil to 1 ounce of water and wash hair daily.

Deodorant Powder: 3/4 c. arrowroot powder 1/4 c. cornstarch 25 drops essential oil Mix into a powder and apply to underarms.

Facial Exfoliate Scrub: Mix equal parts of brown sugar and honey. Rub this on your face and leave for an hour before washing it off.

Facial Toner Mask: 1/4 c. Carrot juice 1/4 c. Cucumber juice 1 tbsp. vinegar Mix well, apply to face and leave on for an hour before washing it off.

Foot Scrub: 1 c. honey 1 c. brown sugar 5 drops of jojoba oil Scrub feet with a loofa.

Hair Darkener: Wash hair daily in coffee or tea.

Hair Lightener: Put lemon juice in hair daily.

Insect Repellant: In 1/2 cup of water, add up to 1 tablespoon of a combination of any of the following herbs:
Tea Tree
Citronella
Eucalyptus
Rosemary
Pine Needle
Sage
Cedar wood
Orange
Peppermint
Eucalyptus
Citronella

Laundry Detergent: 1/2 c. baking soda 1/4 c. vinegar 2 drops essential oil

Liver Spot Removal Wash: Blend together some vitamin E oil, Aloe Vera gel, lemon juice, vinegar, Pineapple, Papaya, Witch Hazel; Lily root and Horseradish. Apply to area a few times a day.

Lotion: 1 c. lard 1/2 c. beeswax 8 drops of essential oil Heat ingredients, mix and let cool in a jar.

Mouthwash: Steep mints in a bottle of vodka, strain out the herbs and gargle with the liquor.

Skin Soothing Bath: Mix in your bath a combination of buttermilk, honey, flaxseed oil and Wild Jewelweed leaves.

Toothpaste: Heat a combination of any of the following herbs in 1/2 cup of water: Horsetail, Echinacea, Myrrh, Sage;
Add to 1 cup baking soda.

Lye Soap: 5 c. lard/grease 3/4 c. lye 1 c. water 3 drops essential oil(s) (of your choice; optional).
If you would like to add the juices of certain plants to the soap, such as Wild Jewelweed (to relieve Poison Ivy itch) and/or Plantain (to sooth skin), boil them in the water. In a large plastic bowl, combine the lard/grease, water and essential oil(s) then pour the lye over them. Stir with a wooden or plastic spoon until the lye liquefied the ingredients, but be careful, as both the lye and the fumes are deadly! After the mixture stops bubbling, pour the mix into plastic molds or a box that's been covered in wax paper. Let set for 6 weeks, and then cut into bars if necessary.

Herbal Dyes:

Black: Alder (leaf), Black Walnut (leaf) and Yarrow (root).

Blue: Elder (berries), Elecampane (bloom), Indigo (bloom), Oregon grape (fruit) and Woad (bloom).

Brown: Burdock, Cascara Sagrada, Comfrey (leaf), Fennel (left), Geranium (leaf), Hops (pods), Juniper, Madder, Onion (bloom), Pokeweed (berries), Poplar (leaf) and Tea.

Gold: Agrimony (bloom), Amaranth (leaf), Dock (bloom), Goldenrod, Lavender Cotton, Mullein (bloom), Onion (bloom), Plantain, Poplar (bloom), Ragwort (bloom), Safflower (bloom), Salsify (bloom) and Yarrow (bloom).

Gray: Elder (bark), Poplar (bark), Raspberry (stalk), Sunflower (root) and Yarrow (root).

Green: Agrimony, Angelica, Barberry, Bayberry, Betony, Coltsfoot, Comfrey, Dock, Fennel, Foxglove, Goldenrod, Horsetail, Marjoram, Mullein, Rosemary, Sage, Salsify, Sunflower, Tansy, Woad and Yarrow.

Orange: Bloodroot (root), Chicory (bloom), Golden Marguerite (bloom), Madder (bloom) and Sunflower (bloom).

Pink: Bloodroot (root), Pokeweed (berries), Sorrel and Woad.

Purple: Blackberry (berry), Geranium (stalk), Grape (berry) and Lady's Bedstraw.

Red: Dandelion (bloom and root), Dock, Hops (leaf), Lady's Bedstraw, Madder, Pokeweed (berries), Potentilla, St Johns Wort and Sweet Woodruff.

Rust: Pokeweed (stalk) and Safflower.

Tan: Barberry (bark), Onion (stalk), Oregon Grape (stalk), Raspberry (stalk), Sunflower (bloom) and Sweet Woodruff.

Yellow: Agrimony (bloom), Barberry, Broom, Chamomile, Dandelion (bloom), Dock, Fennel (bloom), Fenugreek, Golden Marguerite, Goldenrod (bloom), Grindelia, Horseradish, Lady's Bedstraw, Onion (stalk), Safflower (bloom), Saffron (bloom), Sage, St Johns Wort, Sunflower (bloom), Tansy (bloom) and Yarrow (bloom).

Herbal First Aid Kit:

A great first aid kit handles more than just cuts and scrapes. However, you do not need to include any chemical preparations. The medicines can be all-natural, and will still be potent and effective.

1. Antimicrobial healing salve: A comfrey based salve, including herbs such as plantain, St. John's wort, calendula and Echinacea, will soothe, accelerate healing, and disinfect. Essential oils such as lavender and rosemary strengthen the effects. Use for any breaks in the skin and for burns. (Do not use initially on puncture wounds, use an antiseptic such as Echinacea tincture instead).

2. Insect repellant: Essential oils (lavender, citronella, eucalyptus, cedarwood, lemon grass, pennyroyal) suspended in a base of water and alcohol, are pleasant smelling to humans and noxious to bugs. The combination works better than the single oils. Make your own or use the all-natural commercial preparations. Note that eating sugar and sweets increases your attractiveness to many insects! Furthermore, every good outdoors person knows that blue attracts mosquitoes.

3. Muscle aches and pains liniment for external use: Arnica, witch hazel and St. John's Wort tinctures in combination and essential oils of camphor, eucalyptus, rosemary and clove bud are all excellent. Note that some people are sensitive to arnica: STOP if adverse symptoms result. Do not use arnica on broken skin.

4. Poison Ivy and Poison Oak liniment for external use: Jewelweed neutralizes the Rhus toxin and works well. Use fresh or tinctured, but jewelweed can be hard to find. Other remedies include grindelia, combined with Echinacea, calendula and white oak bark.

5. Echinacea tincture: Don't leave home without it. Internal and external antibiotic that provides temporary boost to the immune system. Good in case a cold threatens. Antidotes poison.

6. Ginger capsules: Great remedy for upset stomachs, including motion sickness, morning sickness and gas. Helpful for menstrual cramps. Alternatives: fennel and peppermint.

7. Bentonite clay or charcoal tablets, for diarrhea: These are to assist with detoxification, in case of poisoning. (Of charcoal, take 4 every hour, of bentonite clay; take 1 teaspoon in water, 3-4 times per day). Drink a lot of water. To induce vomiting mix fire pit ashes with water and drink.

8. Meadowsweet tincture: Fast acting, anti-inflammatory, pain-killer. Willow bark tea works well.

9. Thyme essential oil: A "must bring" for camping. Two drops in 4 ounces of water for mouthwash for toothache or sore throat. Same recipe used externally for crabs, lice, and all external parasites. Three drops placed in recently boiled water, inhale the steam for cold, flu, or bronchitis.

10. Rescue Remedy: Outstanding emotional support for all trauma. Very safe. Don't leave home without it. Rescue Remedy is comprised of Cherry Plum, Clematis, Impatiens, Rock Rose, and Star of Bethlehem. It is a wonderful remedy for calming the nerves.

11. Cayenne capsules: Proven styptic. Open and apply externally to stop bleeding. (Yes, it does burn, but it works). It will also warm cold feet, sprinkled inside your boots. Alternative styptics: comfrey and yarrow. Comfrey is perhaps the finest internal anti-hemorrhage we have and is great externally as well.

12. Bug bite and itch relief: Witch hazel, plantain, grindelia, comfrey and St. John's Wort all provide relief from insect bites and general itching. Tinctured combinations of these seem to work best and are applied directly to the skin. Lavender essential oil may be applied directly to the skin and works well. It enhances any tincture combination.

13. Relief from bruises: Useful herbs, typically applied topically in tincture form, include Tienchi ginseng, hyssop, myrrh gum, prickly ash bark, cayenne, calendula, comfrey and arnica. Make your own, use the all-natural commercial preparations, or obtain a "dit dat jao" from a Chinese herbalist. Helichrysum italicum essential oil, applied neat, works very well and is non-irritating. Application of the tincture combination, jao, or essential oil immediately following the bruise may prevent the bruise from forming. Do not use these remedies on the eyes or mucous membranes and wash thoroughly after use.

14. The hardware: "Band Aids", Bandages, 1/2 inch surgical tape, small scissors, single edged razor blade, tweezers, cold pack (cools on impact), ace bandage, bandana. Eye cup (or shot glass). Carry case (soft sided), waterproof for the kit.

15. Snakebite: Echinacea, taken freely in large doses.

If you are sensitive to any of the suggested remedies, don't use them. Read, listen to your body, and educate yourself. Use common sense and seek additional assistance when necessary
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Autumn_Heather
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Rank:Diamond Member

Score:5631
Posts:5631
From: USA
Registered:11/21/2008

RE:Wortcunning- (The Healing Arts)
(Date Posted:02/13/2009 06:30 AM)

Personal Care, Hygiene, and Herbs:

Acne Powder: Mix and powder a combination of any of the following herbs to apply to the face:
Job's Tears seeds
Red Peony root
Goldenthread root
Licorice root
Elecampane root
Marigold flowers
Elder flowers
Speedwell
Dandelion
Red Sage root

Aftershave: Steep Bay leaves in rum for a week. For sensitive skin, simply use Aloe Vera gel.

Basic Lip Balm: 2.5 oz. oil 1/2 oz. beeswax Heat together in a double boiler, mix and pour into container to cool.

Body Scrub: 2/3 c. flaxseed (for dry skin) or gape seeds (for dry skin) 1/3 c. oatmeal or wheat powder 1/4 c. yogurt
Blend well and scrub body with a loofa.

Dandruff Wash: Add 10 drops of Rosemary oil to 1 ounce of water and wash hair daily.

Deodorant Powder: 3/4 c. arrowroot powder 1/4 c. cornstarch 25 drops essential oil Mix into a powder and apply to underarms.

Facial Exfoliate Scrub: Mix equal parts of brown sugar and honey. Rub this on your face and leave for an hour before washing it off.

Facial Toner Mask: 1/4 c. Carrot juice 1/4 c. Cucumber juice 1 tbsp. vinegar Mix well, apply to face and leave on for an hour before washing it off.

Foot Scrub: 1 c. honey 1 c. brown sugar 5 drops of jojoba oil Scrub feet with a loofa.

Hair Darkener: Wash hair daily in coffee or tea.

Hair Lightener: Put lemon juice in hair daily.

Insect Repellant: In 1/2 cup of water, add up to 1 tablespoon of a combination of any of the following herbs:
Tea Tree
Citronella
Eucalyptus
Rosemary
Pine Needle
Sage
Cedar wood
Orange
Peppermint
Eucalyptus
Citronella

Laundry Detergent: 1/2 c. baking soda 1/4 c. vinegar 2 drops essential oil

Liver Spot Removal Wash: Blend together some vitamin E oil, Aloe Vera gel, lemon juice, vinegar, Pineapple, Papaya, Witch Hazel; Lily root and Horseradish. Apply to area a few times a day.

Lotion: 1 c. lard 1/2 c. beeswax 8 drops of essential oil Heat ingredients, mix and let cool in a jar.

Mouthwash: Steep mints in a bottle of vodka, strain out the herbs and gargle with the liquor.

Skin Soothing Bath: Mix in your bath a combination of buttermilk, honey, flaxseed oil and Wild Jewelweed leaves.

Toothpaste: Heat a combination of any of the following herbs in 1/2 cup of water: Horsetail, Echinacea, Myrrh, Sage;
Add to 1 cup baking soda.

Lye Soap: 5 c. lard/grease 3/4 c. lye 1 c. water 3 drops essential oil(s) (of your choice; optional).
If you would like to add the juices of certain plants to the soap, such as Wild Jewelweed (to relieve Poison Ivy itch) and/or Plantain (to sooth skin), boil them in the water. In a large plastic bowl, combine the lard/grease, water and essential oil(s) then pour the lye over them. Stir with a wooden or plastic spoon until the lye liquefied the ingredients, but be careful, as both the lye and the fumes are deadly! After the mixture stops bubbling, pour the mix into plastic molds or a box that's been covered in wax paper. Let set for 6 weeks, and then cut into bars if necessary.

Herbal Dyes:

Black: Alder (leaf), Black Walnut (leaf) and Yarrow (root).

Blue: Elder (berries), Elecampane (bloom), Indigo (bloom), Oregon grape (fruit) and Woad (bloom).

Brown: Burdock, Cascara Sagrada, Comfrey (leaf), Fennel (left), Geranium (leaf), Hops (pods), Juniper, Madder, Onion (bloom), Pokeweed (berries), Poplar (leaf) and Tea.

Gold: Agrimony (bloom), Amaranth (leaf), Dock (bloom), Goldenrod, Lavender Cotton, Mullein (bloom), Onion (bloom), Plantain, Poplar (bloom), Ragwort (bloom), Safflower (bloom), Salsify (bloom) and Yarrow (bloom).

Gray: Elder (bark), Poplar (bark), Raspberry (stalk), Sunflower (root) and Yarrow (root).

Green: Agrimony, Angelica, Barberry, Bayberry, Betony, Coltsfoot, Comfrey, Dock, Fennel, Foxglove, Goldenrod, Horsetail, Marjoram, Mullein, Rosemary, Sage, Salsify, Sunflower, Tansy, Woad and Yarrow.

Orange: Bloodroot (root), Chicory (bloom), Golden Marguerite (bloom), Madder (bloom) and Sunflower (bloom).

Pink: Bloodroot (root), Pokeweed (berries), Sorrel and Woad.

Purple: Blackberry (berry), Geranium (stalk), Grape (berry) and Lady's Bedstraw.

Red: Dandelion (bloom and root), Dock, Hops (leaf), Lady's Bedstraw, Madder, Pokeweed (berries), Potentilla, St Johns Wort and Sweet Woodruff.

Rust: Pokeweed (stalk) and Safflower.

Tan: Barberry (bark), Onion (stalk), Oregon Grape (stalk), Raspberry (stalk), Sunflower (bloom) and Sweet Woodruff.

Yellow: Agrimony (bloom), Barberry, Broom, Chamomile, Dandelion (bloom), Dock, Fennel (bloom), Fenugreek, Golden Marguerite, Goldenrod (bloom), Grindelia, Horseradish, Lady's Bedstraw, Onion (stalk), Safflower (bloom), Saffron (bloom), Sage, St Johns Wort, Sunflower (bloom), Tansy (bloom) and Yarrow (bloom).

Herbal First Aid Kit:

A great first aid kit handles more than just cuts and scrapes. However, you do not need to include any chemical preparations. The medicines can be all-natural, and will still be potent and effective.

1. Antimicrobial healing salve: A comfrey based salve, including herbs such as plantain, St. John's wort, calendula and Echinacea, will soothe, accelerate healing, and disinfect. Essential oils such as lavender and rosemary strengthen the effects. Use for any breaks in the skin and for burns. (Do not use initially on puncture wounds, use an antiseptic such as Echinacea tincture instead).

2. Insect repellant: Essential oils (lavender, citronella, eucalyptus, cedarwood, lemon grass, pennyroyal) suspended in a base of water and alcohol, are pleasant smelling to humans and noxious to bugs. The combination works better than the single oils. Make your own or use the all-natural commercial preparations. Note that eating sugar and sweets increases your attractiveness to many insects! Furthermore, every good outdoors person knows that blue attracts mosquitoes.

3. Muscle aches and pains liniment for external use: Arnica, witch hazel and St. John's Wort tinctures in combination and essential oils of camphor, eucalyptus, rosemary and clove bud are all excellent. Note that some people are sensitive to arnica: STOP if adverse symptoms result. Do not use arnica on broken skin.

4. Poison Ivy and Poison Oak liniment for external use: Jewelweed neutralizes the Rhus toxin and works well. Use fresh or tinctured, but jewelweed can be hard to find. Other remedies include grindelia, combined with Echinacea, calendula and white oak bark.

5. Echinacea tincture: Don't leave home without it. Internal and external antibiotic that provides temporary boost to the immune system. Good in case a cold threatens. Antidotes poison.

6. Ginger capsules: Great remedy for upset stomachs, including motion sickness, morning sickness and gas. Helpful for menstrual cramps. Alternatives: fennel and peppermint.

7. Bentonite clay or charcoal tablets, for diarrhea: These are to assist with detoxification, in case of poisoning. (Of charcoal, take 4 every hour, of bentonite clay; take 1 teaspoon in water, 3-4 times per day). Drink a lot of water. To induce vomiting mix fire pit ashes with water and drink.

8. Meadowsweet tincture: Fast acting, anti-inflammatory, pain-killer. Willow bark tea works well.

9. Thyme essential oil: A "must bring" for camping. Two drops in 4 ounces of water for mouthwash for toothache or sore throat. Same recipe used externally for crabs, lice, and all external parasites. Three drops placed in recently boiled water, inhale the steam for cold, flu, or bronchitis.

10. Rescue Remedy: Outstanding emotional support for all trauma. Very safe. Don't leave home without it. Rescue Remedy is comprised of Cherry Plum, Clematis, Impatiens, Rock Rose, and Star of Bethlehem. It is a wonderful remedy for calming the nerves.

11. Cayenne capsules: Proven styptic. Open and apply externally to stop bleeding. (Yes, it does burn, but it works). It will also warm cold feet, sprinkled inside your boots. Alternative styptics: comfrey and yarrow. Comfrey is perhaps the finest internal anti-hemorrhage we have and is great externally as well.

12. Bug bite and itch relief: Witch hazel, plantain, grindelia, comfrey and St. John's Wort all provide relief from insect bites and general itching. Tinctured combinations of these seem to work best and are applied directly to the skin. Lavender essential oil may be applied directly to the skin and works well. It enhances any tincture combination.

13. Relief from bruises: Useful herbs, typically applied topically in tincture form, include Tienchi ginseng, hyssop, myrrh gum, prickly ash bark, cayenne, calendula, comfrey and arnica. Make your own, use the all-natural commercial preparations, or obtain a "dit dat jao" from a Chinese herbalist. Helichrysum italicum essential oil, applied neat, works very well and is non-irritating. Application of the tincture combination, jao, or essential oil immediately following the bruise may prevent the bruise from forming. Do not use these remedies on the eyes or mucous membranes and wash thoroughly after use.

14. The hardware: "Band Aids", Bandages, 1/2 inch surgical tape, small scissors, single edged razor blade, tweezers, cold pack (cools on impact), ace bandage, bandana. Eye cup (or shot glass). Carry case (soft sided), waterproof for the kit.

15. Snakebite: Echinacea, taken freely in large doses.

If you are sensitive to any of the suggested remedies, don't use them. Read, listen to your body, and educate yourself. Use common sense and seek additional assistance when necessary
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Autumn_Heather
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Rank:Diamond Member

Score:5631
Posts:5631
From: USA
Registered:11/21/2008

RE:Wortcunning- (The Healing Arts)
(Date Posted:02/13/2009 06:31 AM)

Wortcunning is a term that refers to the knowledge (cunning) and use of the secret or hidden properties of herbs (or plants/worts). Herbs or Worts as used for healing and medicinal purposes can be traced all the way back to Egypt's Necropolis of Theban and the Eber Papyrus (one of the world's oldest surviving medical texts). Many of the herbal ingredients and items listed therein may still be found in the dark cubbies and cobwebbed corners of many a modern Witch's cupboards and cabinets today. A majority of these plants or herbs serve a dual function, being both used to treat medicinally as well as magically. 

     One of many tasks a practicing Hedgewytch undertakes during their time of study and learning is discovering the lore about such herbs or worts and learning how they may be utilized in various rites and workings of their own Art or Craft making. Uses of the many varied worts available abound from creating your own powerful aromatic incense blends, stuffing and lining poppet or mommet figures, to uses in workings of a more mantic nature by brewing teas that will be ingested to inspire prophetic dreams.

     No matter what the cause or reason for the use of the herb there are many elements to consider from what the purpose of the rite or working is to the day it is to be held on or done when choosing your selection to harvest from the garden. All plants fall under the subsequent 'rulership' of a particular day of the week and it's corresponding Spirit. By looking over the chart below you will see the various names of these herbs, deities, day of the week and function and by researching what it is you hope to enact with your working you will be able to choose a combination of worts/herbs for that specific purpose. The waxing and waning influence of the moon will also lend its powers and associations to such rites and workings. As an example; the Waxing Moon is good for certain growth blouts and for cup sainings, and Waning Moons are excellent times for curses or banishings - even arthame sainings. Full Moons are splendid times for various types of fertility rites and Houzles. And Dark or New Moons will always belong to Old Fate alone, for those are for workings to discover the very essence of Fate and of the Mystery.

     Proper respect should always be shown for the taking of such gifts from the earth for our use. An offering is called for in situations such as these and a shortened version of the Houzle may be used here or another type of oblation such as a gift of fresh milk for the local land spirits. This milk should be given freely and poured onto the earth near the plant you wish to harvest. One should always be tender and gentle when taking herbs from the ground in this fashion and be thankful for this power that we are given to share. Failure to heed these suggestions may mean the difference between worts harvested with their full spirit intact, (this being a great boon to any working)-- to worts that have no spark or life in them and are not beneficent in any manner either magically or medicinally.


Assembling an Herbal First Aid Kit
I've always been fascinated by first aid kits. As a child I loved going to sporting goods stores where I would run to the camping department and would (clandestinely) open the first aid kits. I was always amazed at what was inside, and what wasn't inside. Always, the kits had Band-Aids, surgical tape, bandages, and an ointment. Some kits had a razor blade and suction cup for snake bite (I never met anyone who had used this). Some kits had aspirin. First aid seemed to mean cuts and scrapes and possible snake bite.
I'm still fascinated by first aid kits, but have changed my question from "what's inside?" to "what do I need to be prepared?" Things I needed to be prepared for have included:
* Cuts and scrapes
* Burns
* Bug bites
* Contact rashes
* Upset stomach
* Diarrhea
* Muscle aches
* Bleeding and Bruises
* Poison Ivy and Poison Oak rash
* Sore throat, colds, upper respiratory problems
* (So far, no snake bites)
A great first aid kit, would handle more than just cuts and scrapes. Ideally, I would not include any chemical preparations. The medicines would be all-natural, potent and effective. I would include the following:
1. Antimicrobial healing salve. A comfrey based salve, including herbs such as plantain, St. John's wort, calendula and echinacea, will soothe, accelerate healing, and disinfect. Essential oils such as lavender and rosemary strengthen the effects. Use for any breaks in the skin and for burns. (Do not use initially on puncture wounds, use an antiseptic such as echinacea tincture instead)
2. Insect repellant. Essential oils (lavender, citronella, eucalyptus, cedarwood, lemon grass, pennyroyal) suspended in a base of water and alcohol, are pleasant smelling to humans and noxious to bugs. The combinations work better than the single oils. Make your own or use the all-natural commercial preparations. Note that eating sugar and sweets increases your attractiveness to many insects! (Caution: Although pennyroyal essential oil is widely used for insect repellants, I recommend against this use. It can be toxic even in moderate doses and is specifically contraindicated for so many people - especially pregnant women. It is powerful and can effect people and pets in the vicinity of the user.)
3. Muscle aches and pains liniment for external use: Arnica, witch hazel and St. John's Wort tinctures in combination and essential oils of camphor, eucalyptus, rosemary and clove bud are all excellent. Note that some people are sensitive to arnica: STOP if adverse symptoms result. Do not use arnica on broken skin.
4. Poison Ivy and Poison Oak liniment for external use. Jewelweed (impatiens) specifically neutralizes the Rhus toxin and works well. Use fresh or tinctured, but jewelweed can be hard to find. Other remedies include grindelia, combined with echinacea, calendula and white oak bark.
5. Echinacea tincture. Don't leave home without it. Internal and external antibiotic, provides temporary boost to the immune system. Good in case a cold threatens. Antidotes poison.
6. Ginger capsules. Great remedy for tummy upsets, including motion sickness, morning sickness and gas. Helpful for menstrual cramps. Alternatives: fennel and peppermint.
7. Bentonite clay or charcoal tablets, for diarrhea. These are to assist with detoxification, in case of poisoning. (Of charcoal, take 4 every hour, of bentonite clay, take 1 teaspoon in water, 3-4 times per day). Drink a lot of water. Helpful herbs include blackberry root or leaf (root is preferred for its greater astringency: simmer root for 20-40 minutes or steep leaf for tea for 10-30 minutes). Similarly, use wild strawberry root or leaf. Raspberry leaf provides a very mild remedy for diarrhea. Slippery elm tea also provides a fine remedy (but is still an endangered plant!). Blackberry and strawberry root and leaf also will reduce internal hemorrhaging. Cooked white rice works wonders at reducing diarrhea.
8. Meadowsweet tincture or aspirin. Fast acting, anti-inflammatory, pain-killers. Willow bark tea works well.
9. Thyme essential oil. A "must bring" for camping. Two drops in 4 ounces of water for mouthwash for toothache or sore throat. Same recipe used externally for crabs, lice, and all external parasites. Two drops placed in recently boiled water, inhale the steam for cold, flu, or bronchitis.
10. Rescue Remedy or Five Flower Formula. Outstanding emotional support for all trauma. Very safe. Don't leave home without it.
11. Cayenne capsules. Proven styptic. Open and apply externally to stop bleeding. (Yes, it does burn, but it works). It will also warm cold feet, sprinkled inside your boots. Alternative styptics: comfrey and yarrow. Comfrey is perhaps the finest internal anti-hemorrhage we have and is great externally as well, but it recently has come under FDA criticism (read some good herbal texts and decide for yourself. Me, I think it's a great herb).
12. Bug bite and itch relief. Witch hazel, plantain, grindelia, comfrey and St. John's Wort all provide relief from insect bites and general itching. Tinctured combinations of these seem to work best and are applied directly to the skin. Juice from the plantain is mildly effective and it grows throughout this region (just crumple the leaves and rub onto the skin). Lavender essential oil may be applied directly to the skin and works well. It enhances any tincture combination.
13. Relief from bruises. I think of these as wounds where the skin is unbroken, often accompanied by discoloration. Useful herbs, typically applied topically in tincture form, include Tienchi ginseng, hyssop, myrrh gum, prickly ash bark, cayenne, calendula, comfrey and arnica. Make your own, use the all-natural commercial preparations, or obtain a "dit dat jao" from a Chinese herbalist. Helichrysum italicum essential oil, applied neat, works very well and is non-irritating. Application of the tincture combination, jao, or essential oil immediately following the bruise may prevent the bruise from forming. Do not use these remedies on the eyes or mucous membranes and wash thoroughly after use.
14. The hardware: Band Aids, Bandages, 1/2 inch surgical tape, small scissors, single edged razor blade, tweezers, cold pack (cools on impact), ace bandage, bandana. Eye cup (or shot glass). Carry case (soft sided, waterproof) for the kit.
So go ahead, assemble a kit for yourself, your friends, or your family. They make great gifts. Remember, these are suggestions only and are based upon the assumption that any first aid kit will have space and weight limitations. There are other choices for all of the categories given. If you are sensitive to any of the suggested remedies, don't use them. Read, listen to your body, and educate yourself. Use common sense and seek additional assistance when necessary.
(Oh yes, the echinacea is helpful when it comes to snakebite).


Your Herbal First Aide Kit
 
 
Below is a list of preparations you will find effective in treating and
soothing everyday ailments. Keep them on hand and use them for your First Aid Herbal Approach
 
 
Lavender Essential Oil
Sinus headaches. Rub 2 drops of lavender into the forehead. Mix together - 3 drops of lavender essential oil into 1 tsp. of olive oil. Massage temples and neck to relieve headaches.
 
 
Honey
Draws pus out of wounds. Use as cough reliever. Mix 2 Tbs. lemon juice and 2 Tbs. honey in a small container. Sip slowly. Honey is also a natural
antibiotic, and it truly does work to heal minor cuts. Is also good taken
plain for sore throats and colds.
 
 
Aloe Vera
Soothes minor burns and sunburn.
 
Garlic
Used to rid the body of infection. Rub on corns and acne. Take two cloves of garlic and slice add a 1/2 cup of honey let sit for 4 hours, take sliced garlic out and take a teaspoonful for coughs and sore throats.
 
 
Tea Tree Oil
Antiseptic and anti-fungal oil. Great for cold sores. This is great to use for yeast infections. Put a few drops into a douche of warm water and use 2-3 times a day for a couple of days. Also good in shampoos to keep lice out of your school child's hair. A drop of tea tree and a drop of lavender oil and
1 tablespoonful of olive oil works great on pimple break outs.
 
 
Ginger Tea
Ease travel sickness or an upset stomach. Make a cup of tea with ground ginger
or grated ginger root. Ginger also makes a wonderful bath for sick children and adults. Just put about a tsp. of ginger in a tepid bath and then soak. This helps congestion, as well as upset tummies.
 
 
Echinacea
Take 2 capsules daily to ward off a cold during the cold flu season. (*And don't forget Vitamin C and zinc with this to really zap a cold.)
 
 
Witch Hazel
Use to clean cuts. 1 part witch hazel 4 parts water. This is also a fabulous bruise healer. Soak a cotton pad in witch hazel and apply the pad to the area for as long as you can keep it on there. Witch hazel is also a great toner for the skin.
 
 
 
Chamomile and Lavender
Use dried herbs or tea bags. Chamomile tea: soothes nerves, insomnia and digestive problems. Lavender: relieves headaches, migraines, stress, reduces painful swelling. Both herbs can be infused and use as a skin tonic. 2 cups of chamomile tea in a bath will calm restless children, infants and adults.
 
HERBAL EXTRACTS
Herbal tinctures and extracts are the preferred form of medicine as they are assimilated quickly and administered easily. Tincturing also extracts valuable constituents not found in teas since certain active plant properties are only soluble in alcohol. If you dislike the alcohol, you can reduce its presence somewhat by placing the drops in a half cup of hot, boiled water and allowing it to sit for 15 minutes. You can also mix the extract with juice to disguise the taste. To keep things in perspective, it has been said there's more alcohol in a ripe banana than in the suggested dosage of herbal extracts.
Arnica. This external remedy makes a great massage liniment for sore and cramped muscles. It will decrease pain and prevent swelling and bruising associated with torn ligaments, sprains, crushed fingers and toes, and broken bones -- provided the skin is not broken. Arnica works best if applied immediately after an injury and continued every couple hours for the first day.
Cayenne. Five to ten drops diluted in two ounces of water can be used internally for frostbite and hypothermia. It moves the blood from the center of the body to the peripheral areas, warming hands and feet. A couple drops under the tongue will help to revive someone in shock or trauma. Used externally for heavily bleeding lacerations, it will coagulate the blood to stanch the flow (though it stings a mite).
Valerian. As an antispasmodic and painkiller, this herb relieves intestinal and menstrual cramps, headaches and general aches or pains. As a nervine, it will bring sleep to an exhausted person. The dosage range is 30 to 60 drops.
Echinacea. Besides possessing the ability to increase the supply of white blood cells to an infected area, thus boosting the immune system, echinacea is also antibiotic and antibacterial to gram positive bacteria such as strep or staph. It's helpful with fevers, poisoning, or any type of internal infection and has reportedly been used for poisonous insect and snake bites by many native Plains tribes. Echinacea is a good preventative and supportive herb for the onset of the flu or common cold. The dosage ranges from 30 to 60 drops, the higher ranges used for fevers and acute situations. For toothaches, it can be massaged into the surrounding gums and teeth. For poisonous bites, 60 drops every 15 minutes is appropriate.
Grindelia. As an external remedy, grindelia cools and soothes hot, irritated skin rashes, sunburns, itchy insect bites and poison ivy. When taken internally, it helps expel mucus obstruction in the bronchioles and may be useful for some types of asthma and respiratory congestion.
Milk thistle combination.This can include milk thistle, burdock and kelp in equal parts. An alternative to chaparral that acts to leach heavy metals and radiation toxicity from the thyroid, blood, and liver as well as protects the liver against further damage. Good to take before and after dental x-rays and after taking Tylenol or Advil.
Quassia. As an antimicrobial, this herb is traditionally used for bacterial diarrhea, dysentery, and giardia -- a lower gastrointestinal complaint contracted by drinking contaminated water. The standard dose is three to five droppersful every six hours. To treat suspected bad water, add 30 drops to each quart of water.
Syrup of Ipecac. This standard remedy promotes vomiting and should only be used in certain types of poisoning.
Flower rescue remedy. Used for emotional trauma for all ages, flower essences work quickly and effectively on symptoms ranging from hyperventilation to neurosis. Rubbing the drops on the temples and wrists of hysterical children unable to take anything orally will have an immediate calming influence. Extracts will keep their potency for several years if stored in a dark and cool place.POWDERED HERBS
Slippery elm capsules. Used for food poisoning, this powder combines and buffers poisons in the stomach and bowels to decrease toxic absorption. It can soothe mucous membranes and settle an upset stomach.
Ginger root capsules. Use two caps for motion and morning sickness. It's also effective for nausea caused by flu or bad food.
Marshmallow-peppermint oil capsules. This is an easy-to-make combination of four parts marshmallow powder to one part peppermint oil. The powder in this formula is basically a vehicle for the peppermint oil to reach the small intestines without dissolving in the stomach. The capsules reduce intestinal cramping that can accompany any gastrointestinal tract infection.
For children not able to swallow capsules, you can dissolve the contents in four cups of juice or sweetened water.
Poultice combination powder. This should consist of at least one antibacterial herb, one antifungal, an emollient, and an astringent. A possible combination can contain equal parts gentian, myrrh gum, goldenseal, and marshmallow. This powder can be stored in a zip-lock plastic bag and makes a nice dust for sore feet, lacerations (it will stop excess bleeding), diaper rash, infections, insect bites, or inflamed eyes (it is cooling and soothing). A tea of these herbs can be used externally as a wash. For foreign objects in the eye, make a paste by adding water to the mix and bandage it over the closed eyelid to draw the object out and soothe the eye simultaneously.OILS
Peppermint. A little on the temples can help you stay awake and a few drops in water will settle an upset stomach.
Tea tree oil. Called a "first aid kit in a bottle," tea tree (Melaleuca leucadendron) oil has strong antifungal and antibiotic properties with antiseptic abilities. It can be used for fungal infections, pus-filled wounds or burns, cold sores, and herpes lesions. For use with earaches and on sensitive skin, dilute with equal parts olive oil. Use sparingly -- tea tree oil goes a long way.SALVES
A good all purpose salve is essential. You want one that will draw and shrink swollen tissues, fight bacteria, and soothe compromised tissues. Here is a list of common herbs that fall in each category:
Emollients -- marshmallow, slippery elm, plantain, comfrey, and mullein;
Antimicrobials -- echinacea, goldenseal, yerba mansa, Oregon grape, osha, propolis, myrrh gum, garlic, calendula, chamomile, chaparral, gentian, and usnea;
Astringents -- horsetail, bistort, geranium, rose, alum, yarrow, witch hazel, yellow dock, and St. John's wort.
A combination of one herb from each category is a good disinfectant for anaerobic bacteria and is soothing to epithelial cells. The mixture will also cut down on bleeding and slow the scarring process. It will speed up the healing time and can be used anywhere a salve is needed to coat and protect.
All of the herbal products mentioned are available at most health food stores or by mail order herb businesses (see margin). All of the hardware can be found at your local pharmacy. If you are making your own extracts, start with either fresh or whole plants and cut to near powder yourself. The herb will be more potent. If you are buying your extracts and bulk herbs, look to see that they are either organically grown or ethically wild harvested, which means they were gathered in a conservative, sustainable manner that does no harm to the full survival of the plant species. If this is not written on the label ask your retailer to provide you with documentation as this information should always be available to the customer. Be sure to include dosage information on the bottles as well as in the instruction booklet, which can be nothing more than 3x5 cards that you can cover with see-through packing tape to waterproof and keep clean. The actual kit can be
made out of many different things: a cigar box, a gutted cassette case, or something you make out of durable canvas material with a Velcro closure. Keep your first aid kit compact and organized with dividers or see-through nylon mesh so everything can be found quickly.
Using herbal remedies -- either those you prepare yourself or ones that are made by environmentally responsible companies -- is self-empowering. And it's rewarding to know you had a hand in the healing process.
 
RecipesThese are the remedies you will reach for most often. All of these items are available in health food stores and here are some recipes you can make yourself. Making herbal remedies yourself is fun, can save your family lots of money and assures you the highest quality.
Mullein Garlic Ear Oil 1/4 cup Mullein Flowers
3 cloves Garlic
Olive oil
Preparation: Chop the garlic into small pieces. Place the garlic and mullein flowers in a small glass jar with a lid. Cover the mullein flowers with olive oil and allow to set in the sun for several days, or heat over very low heat for 4 hours. If you are using fresh mullein flowers, cover your jar with cheesecloth rather than a lid to allow moisture to escape. Strain the oil through cheesecloth and store your oil in a small dropper bottle in the refrigerator.
To use warm the oil to body temperature by placing the bottle of oil in a glass of hot water for a few minutes. Insert 2-3 drops in the affected ear 2-3 times per day.
If there is fluid oozing from the ear or any chance that the ear drum is perforated do not use the ear oil
Herbal Salve 1 part St. John's Wort
1 part Calendula
1 part Comfrey leaf
1 part Plantain
Olive Oil
Beeswax
Vitamin E

Great all purpose salve. Use for insect bites, itching, wounds, burns and on fungal infections.
To begin your salve, measure the desired amount of herbs into an enamel or stainless steel pan, or into a crock pot.
Cover the herbs with oil. Use enough oil to cover the herbs plus another inch of oil above the level of herbs.
Heat the herbs and oil over a low heat for several hours ( about 3 hours). If you are using roots you should heat the oil longer( about 5 hours). I strongly encourage you to use a crock pot for heating your oil because it operates at a controlled low temperature which is less likely to be a fire hazard. If you don't use a crock pot then use a double boiler.
After heating, cool your oil for awhile. Set up a strainer lined with cheesecloth then pour the oil through to strain. When most of the oil has filtered through the cheesecloth, pick up the cheesecloth, keeping the herbs enclosed, and squeeze as much oil as possible from the herbs and cloth.
Add beeswax to the oil and heat it until all the wax is melted. To test to see if your salve is hard enough, put some on a spoon and set it in a cool place for a few minutes. If your salve is too soft, add more beeswax.
If you are using essential oils or Vitamin E you can blend them in now. Finally, pour your salve into containers and label.
Note - If 1 part equals 1/3 cup then you will need 12 - 14 ounces of oil and about 1 ounce of beeswax.
Usnea Tincture 1 ounce Usnea barbata
1 cup 100 proof vodka
To make an alcohol tincture you will need the herb, 100 proof grain alcohol and a labeled glass jar. Do not use isopropyl rubbing alcohol which is very toxic when ingested!
Place the chopped herbs in a glass jar and cover with alcohol plus another inch of alcohol above the level of the herbs. Shake the mixture well to bring the alcohol into to contact with all surfaces of the herb. Label the jar with the contents and the date. Shake your tincture everyday throughout the next six weeks. Strain and use as needed.
Usnea is best extracted in alcohol as some constituents are not soluble in glycerin. If you don't wish to consume alcohol it is possible to put the required dosage into a cup with an few ounces of boiling water. The heat will cause the alcohol to evaporate leaving the therapeutic qualities of the herb in the water.
Echinacea Glycerite 2 ounces Echinacea purpurea root
4 ounces pure vegetable glycerin
2 ounces distilled water
Follow the same basic instructions for making the alcohol tincture substituting glycerin for alcohol. To make a glycerin tincture you can cover your herbs with 3/4 part glycerin with 1/4 part water.
Glycerin is very sweet and will dissolve mucilage, vitamins and minerals. It will not dissolve the resinous or oily properties of herbs very well. Because glycerin is sweet it is an excellent choice for children's remedies. Make glycerin tinctures in small amounts because it will not last as long as an alcohol tincture, about 1 to 3 years. Be sure to use 100 % vegetable glycerin.  
Dosages for Children Dosages for children are not provided in most herbals. To determine the correct dose you need to consider the size of the child, the ailment, the power of the herb you intend to use, and the adult dosage.
Clark's Rule for determining dosages divides the weight of the child by 150 to give the approximate fraction of the adult dose. Dosage for a 40 lb. child: 40 /150 = .26 or approx. 1/4 the adult dose.
The information in this article should not replace the advice of your medical Doctor

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RE:Wortcunning- (The Healing Arts)
(Date Posted:02/13/2009 06:32 AM)

Guide to
Health Supplements

The use of Health Supplements may help bring relief but they can not cure

If you feel ill then your first course of action must be to see a doctor

 

ALOE VERA has antioxidant properties and may benefit the immune system, those with stiff joints, digestion and circulation of the blood.

BEE PROPOLIS is rich in antioxidant bioflavonoid, essential oils, resins & waxes.

BETA CAROTENE protects body cells and may benefit smokers or those under stress.

CALCIUM is essential for healthy teeth and bones, muscle growth, rhythmic heart action and the transmission of nerve impulses. It may benefit breastfeeding women, growing children, the elderly, post menopausal women, vegans, slimmers.

CO-ENZYME Q10 helps release energy and may benefit the elderly and athletes.

COD LIVER OIL has essential Omega 3 fatty acids which help with the maintenance of healthy membranes and transporting fats around the body. It may benefit the elderly to maintain a healthy heart, circulation, healthy joints. It is rich in the Vitamins A and D for the maintenance of healthy skin, teeth and bones.

EVENING PRIMROSE  (Oenothera biennis) has Gamma Linolenic Acid (GLA) and essential Omega 6 fatty acid to help body functions run smoothly and to help maintain healthy skin. It may benefit premenstrual and menopausal women. See Star Flower.

FOLIC ACID helps the production of red blood cells. Government recommendation is 400mcg per day for women planning to become pregnant, or in early pregnancy when it is especially important for the development of the baby.

GARLIC helps maintain a healthy heart, increase immunity to combat infections.

GINKGO BILOBA stimulates blood circulation and may benefit those with cold hands and feet, poor memory and assist with concentration.

GINSENG helps maintain the body in balance and may benefit people with a busy life, the elderly, athletes. Thought to help maintain a healthy sex drive.

GLUCOSAMINE SULPHATE allows rebuilding of connective tissue, cartilage, tendons, ligaments and joint lubrication fluid and should benefit those with stiff joints.

HALIBUT LIVER OIL is stronger than Cod Liver Oil and has the same properties.  Do not use when pregnant.

IRON is essential for red blood development and may benefit vegetarians and vegans.

LECITHIN helps maintain healthy cells, heart and circulation and may benefit those wishing to manage their blood cholesterol levels.

NIACIN (Vitamin B3) releases the energy from food, and may benefit pregnant or breastfeeding, the elderly, or those facing physical or emotional stress.

ROYAL JELLY is thought to assist general well being and may benefit the very active.

SELENIUM may protect body cells and help maintain the body's defence system. This may benefit the elderly, slimmers, vegetarians and breastfeeding women.

STAR FLOWER (Borage Oil) has double the concentration of  Gamma Linolenic Acid (GLA)  than Evening Primrose Oil  to help body functions run smoothly and to help maintain healthy skin. It may benefit premenstrual and menopausal women.

VITAMIN A helps maintain skin, eyes, growth and may benefit children and smokers.

VITAMIN B1 (Thiamine) releases the energy from food, aids the nervous system, and may benefit pregnant or breastfeeding women, the elderly, drinkers, or athletes.

VITAMIN B2 (Riboflavin) releases the energy from food and may benefit pregnant or breastfeeding women, drinkers, or smokers.

VITAMIN B3 (Niacinomide) aids in energy  metabolism, helps maintains normal functioning of the nervous and digestive tract and may lower blood cholesterol. 

VITAMIN B5 (Calcium Pantothenate) aids in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism and synthesizes hormones and cholesterol.

VITAMIN B6 (Pyroxidine) promotes healthy skin and nerves, helps produce hormones and antibodies. May benefit women prior to menstruation.

VITAMIN B12 (Cobalamin)  is essential for healthy nerve and blood cells. It may benefit pregnant or breastfeeding women, vegetarians, the elderly, growing children.

VITAMIN C for healthy tissue, fighting infections and wound healing. It helps the body to absorb iron and may benefit pregnant and breastfeeding women, the elderly, assist with convalescence, drinkers and smokers.

VITAMIN D is essential for the utilisation of calcium for strong bones and teeth. May benefit those deprived of sunlight, homebound, office workers, vegetarians, vegans.

VITAMIN E helps maintain healthy blood, tissue and cells, and may protect against damaging pollution and sunlight. May benefit women on the contraceptive pill. One could take unrefined natural Wheatgerm Oil which is a very good source of vitamin E.

VITAMIN K is essential for blood clotting, and may help to heal wounds.

ZINC has a vital role in enzyme production and may benefit the elderly or slimmers.

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